REAL WORLD EVENT DISCUSSIONS

The Texas Disaster

POSTED BY: JEWELSTAITEFAN
UPDATED: Monday, April 12, 2021 16:09
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Monday, February 22, 2021 3:59 PM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


Some may think this is about the weather which visited Texas the past week or so, but their disaster has been ongoing for years.

Texas has claimed to be at the leading forefront of Tech power, replacing reliable Power sources with Renewable Power, such as Solar Power and Wind Power.

Solar Power output was 0% in the past week, just like in Yurp.
Wind power failed as well. Just like in Yurp.

They have been practicing rolling blackouts for years now, knowing their Renewable Energies wer4e a failure, but just ignoring the problem.


Without energy, pumps could not fuel the trucks. Loaded semis sat idling at the edge of the Texas blackout zone, while store shelves remained empty. Milk had to be dumped, as well as eggs, and livestock died without energy.

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Monday, February 22, 2021 7:58 PM

SECOND

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly


Et Tu, Ted? Why Deregulation Failed

At first, those Texans who didn’t lose power in the big freeze considered themselves lucky. But then the bills arrived — and some families found themselves being charged thousands of dollars for a few days of electricity. Many families probably can’t afford to pay those bills, so we’re potentially looking at a wave of personal bankruptcies. And even those who don’t face ruin are, predictably, outraged.

Possibly the most revealing remark of the Texas crisis so far was a tweet by, of all people, Senator Ted Cruz (R-Cancún), who fumed that “no power company should get a windfall because of a natural disaster” and called on “state and local regulators” to “prevent this injustice.”

The senator, not known for self-awareness, may not realize what he did there. But if even Ted Cruz — Ted Cruz! — believes that regulators should prevent power companies from reaping windfall profits in a disaster, that eliminates any private-sector financial incentive to prepare for such a disaster. And that, in turn, destroys the entire premise behind radical deregulation.

So will the Republicans who hold all of Texas’ statewide offices learn from this debacle, and rethink their whole approach to energy policy? Of course not. Their immediate reaction was to falsely blame the crisis on wind power, and lash out at advocates of a Green New Deal — even though something like a Green New Deal, that is, public investment in energy infrastructure, is exactly what Texas needs.

And one thing we’ve definitely learned over the past few months is that once politicians commit themselves to a Big Lie, whether it involves epidemiology, economics or election results, there’s no turning back.

But while the right-wing political-media complex can’t and won’t learn anything from the Texas power debacle, the rest of us can. We’ve just been offered a clear view of the dark (and cold) side of free-market fundamentalism. And that’s a lesson we shouldn’t forget.

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/02/22/opinion/texas-electricity-storm.htm
l


The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly

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Monday, February 22, 2021 9:04 PM

6IXSTRINGJACK


Solar Power is great until the sun isn't out.


--------------------------------------------------

A government is a body of people usually, notably, governed by Mark Zuckerborg and Slack Dorsey.

Collection of links to Second's, Nilbog's and Marcos' death threats: https://cutt.ly/tkCvEX6

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Tuesday, February 23, 2021 7:52 AM

SECOND

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly


Quote:

Originally posted by 6ixStringJack:
Solar Power is great until the sun isn't out.

Natural gas is great for generating electricity, until hydrates block pipelines, shutting down the power plant furnaces.
https://petrowiki.spe.org/Hydrate_problems_in_production

Coal is great for electricity until the CO2 from burning coal gets high enough to melt glaciers. The last time the atmospheric CO2 amounts were this high was more than 3 million years ago, when temperature was 3.6°–5.4°F higher than during the pre-industrial era, and sea level was 50–80 feet higher than today.
https://www.climate.gov/news-features/understanding-climate/climate-ch
ange-atmospheric-carbon-dioxide


The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly

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Tuesday, February 23, 2021 9:25 AM

JONGSSTRAW


Quote:

Originally posted by JEWELSTAITEFAN:
Some may think this is about the weather which visited Texas the past week or so, but their disaster has been ongoing for years.

Texas has claimed to be at the leading forefront of Tech power, replacing reliable Power sources with Renewable Power, such as Solar Power and Wind Power.

Solar Power output was 0% in the past week, just like in Yurp.
WQind power failed as well.


Enron was based in Texas. Biggest energy scam ever. What else does anyone need to know?

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Tuesday, February 23, 2021 10:23 AM

SECOND

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly


Quote:

Originally posted by Jongsstraw:
Quote:

Originally posted by JEWELSTAITEFAN:
Some may think this is about the weather which visited Texas the past week or so, but their disaster has been ongoing for years.

Texas has claimed to be at the leading forefront of Tech power, replacing reliable Power sources with Renewable Power, such as Solar Power and Wind Power.

Solar Power output was 0% in the past week, just like in Yurp.
WQind power failed as well.


Enron was based in Texas. Biggest energy scam ever. What else does anyone need to know?

Let me check Enron: Oct. 12, 2001 Arthur Andersen legal counsel tells auditors to destroy all Enron files, except Enron's most basic documents. Why? Because Enron's leadership was fooling regulators with fake holdings and off-the-books accounting practices.
https://www.investopedia.com/updates/enron-scandal-summary/

What you were seeing with Enron is that Texans will lie for money.

There is an article about Texans (actually Republicans) lying about solar and wind. Fact Check: Is Green Energy to Blame for Texas' Power Outages? No.
https://www.newsweek.com/fact-check-green-energy-power-cuts-texas-1569
922


It was natural gas and coal that caused Texas' power outage, but the Texans who own coal/oil/gas companies lied because green power is kicking their asses with cheaper energy prices.

By the way, Enron's auditor, Arthur Andersen LLP, is defunct because it allowed Enron's Texans to lie freely. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_Andersen#Demise

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly

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Tuesday, February 23, 2021 3:59 PM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


Quote:

Originally posted by second:
Quote:

Originally posted by 6ixStringJack:
Solar Power is great until the sun isn't out.

Natural gas is great for generating electricity, until hydrates block pipelines, shutting down the power plant furnaces.
https://petrowiki.spe.org/Hydrate_problems_in_production

Hey, dumbass, the adults are talking here, m'kay?

Hydtrates are not stopping Power plants, that is the production plants under sea, at the sea floor level.




And now we enter fairyland, courtesy algore's greatest invention besides the Internet:
Quote:


Coal is great for electricity until the CO2 from burning coal gets high enough to melt glaciers. The last time the atmospheric CO2 amounts were this high was more than 3 million years ago, when temperature was 3.6°–5.4°F higher than during the pre-industrial era, and sea level was 50–80 feet higher than today.
https://www.climate.gov/news-features/understanding-climate/climate-ch
ange-atmospheric-carbon-dioxide


The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly


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Tuesday, February 23, 2021 4:41 PM

1KIKI

Goodbye, kind world (George Monbiot) - In common with all those generations which have contemplated catastrophe, we appear to be incapable of understanding what confronts us.



Just fyi the endquote [ /quote] function doesn't play well with links. You need to put a space in between the link and the endquote for the endquote to work.


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Tuesday, February 23, 2021 4:59 PM

1KIKI

Goodbye, kind world (George Monbiot) - In common with all those generations which have contemplated catastrophe, we appear to be incapable of understanding what confronts us.



While there are different estimates of how much Texas electricity is generated by which source, and how much of those sources were actually offline during the storm, it's clear that neither solar nor wind power were responsible for either the majority of energy generated during normal times, or for the significant loss of power during the storm.

FWIW I've read that a significant portion of oil and gas electricity production was offline due to 'freezing'. My impression is that this wasn't 'hydrates' but normal water-ice formation at low temperatures. Since a significant portion of oil and nat gas production and transmission (pipeline) is above ground and in metal equipment, and since metal is a fantastic conductor of heat, it seems plausible to me that the entire infrastructure was frozen - and not limited to oil and nat gas production and transmission.


https://d.newsweek.com/en/full/1738339/texas-electricity-generation-st
atista.webp






https://www.eia.gov/state/?sid=TX#tabs-4

These failing sources largely included nuclear plants, coal plants and thermal energy generators. Frozen wind turbines were a factor, too, but Woodfin said wind shutdowns accounted for less than 13% of the outages.
https://www.statesman.com/story/news/2021/02/17/texas-energy-wind-powe
r-outage-natural-gas-renewable-green-new-deal/6780546002
/

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Tuesday, February 23, 2021 10:24 PM

SECOND

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly


Fossil Fuel Executives Gloat About Profits From Texas Winter Storm Crisis

As a severe winter storm swept Texas last week, cutting electricity from millions of residents in freezing temperatures and causing nearly 70 deaths so far, some energy executives saw an upside to the catastrophe.

“Obviously, this week is like hitting the jackpot,” boasted Roland Burns, the chief executive and chief financial officer of Comstock Resources, a shale drilling company that benefited from the sudden demand for natural gas, in a call with investors last Wednesday. The price for gas, said Burns, has been “incredible.”

The price of natural gas, which skyrocketed as power plants and industrial consumers scrambled to secure additional supply, benefited other energy interests. Macquarie Group, an investment bank that is the second-biggest physical gas supplier in the U.S., reported a windfall of $210 million from the swing in gas and electricity prices.

More at https://theintercept.com/2021/02/23/texas-winter-storm-gas-prices-exec
utives
/

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly

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Tuesday, February 23, 2021 11:03 PM

6IXSTRINGJACK


Quote:

Originally posted by 1KIKI:

Just fyi the endquote [ /quote] function doesn't play well with links. You need to put a space in between the link and the endquote for the endquote to work.






It's nice to know that at least a few people on these boards are still intelligent and courteous.

This is a problem that happens nearly every day here. I just don't make a fuss about it unless somebody chronically screws it up like idiot Ted.


--------------------------------------------------

A government is a body of people usually, notably, governed by Mark Zuckerborg and Slack Dorsey.

Collection of links to Second's, Nilbog's and Marcos' death threats: https://cutt.ly/tkCvEX6

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Tuesday, February 23, 2021 11:10 PM

6IXSTRINGJACK


lol

Why would a dummy ever admit to that?

Looks like Mr. Burns is trying to Cuomo himself.


lol... Mr. Burns...

This shit just writes itself.




--------------------------------------------------

A government is a body of people usually, notably, governed by Mark Zuckerborg and Slack Dorsey.

Collection of links to Second's, Nilbog's and Marcos' death threats: https://cutt.ly/tkCvEX6

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Wednesday, February 24, 2021 6:00 PM

SECOND

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly


Surviving the Texas Freeze in a Gerrymandered City

The Texas freeze proved that our representatives feel no obligation to their constituents.

The first I heard from my congressman was at 5:14 p.m. last Tuesday, some 39 hours after Austinites began reporting they’d lost power in the midst of a deadly winter freeze. The high that day was 26 degrees, the low 7, and when the email came, my husband and I had just slid a half-mile down icy, barren streets to get warm at a friend’s apartment, our own heat and electricity having gone out that morning.

The congressman was not emailing to see how we were holding up. Instead, he seemed primarily concerned with assigning blame for the outages, which would leave, at their height, 4 million Texans without power and result in overwhelmed hospitals and an as-yet-unknown number of deaths. “Radical ideologies have politicized energy policy at the state and federal levels in recent years,” he declared, echoing the sentiments of other Republicans, who had already begun falsely blaming renewable energy sources as the primary reason for the outages. The congressman was in touch with various agencies to see how “additional federal deregulation” might solve the problem. To those still without heat and electricity, he suggested consulting an outage map for which he’d forgotten to include the URL; the “here” we were to click on linked to nothing.

The day after Roy’s initial email, subfreezing conditions continuing and much of Austin’s power, including ours, still out with no end in sight, the congressman released a statement not explaining how he planned to help the struggling citizens of his district but eulogizing Rush Limbaugh. “You may now return your talent to God, loaned to you to share with us all these years,” he wrote.

Roy wasn’t the only Austin Republican whose priorities did not seem to include looking out for Austinites last week. Like Roy, Rep. Roger Williams of the 25th District, was offering his own condolences to Limbaugh (“I’ll always cherish the time I got to spend with him”) and, bizarrely, attacking New York Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (“Rule #1 for the Socialist Democrat Party, use any crisis available to lasso control”).

By contrast, Austin’s lone Democratic representative, Lloyd Doggett, who was also operating without power for much of last week, nonetheless used his social media feeds as a clearinghouse for essential information like where to find water, food, and warming shelters. Meanwhile, Ocasio-Cortez has raised $5 million in relief money for Texans, while former Rep. Beto O’Rourke, who currently does not hold elective office, ran a virtual phone bank through which volunteers made almost 800,000 phone calls to Texas seniors, connecting them with food, water and transportation.

More at https://web.archive.org/web/20210224203447/https://slate.com/news-and-
politics/2021/02/texas-gerrymandering-freeze-power-outages-chip-roy.html


The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly

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Wednesday, February 24, 2021 6:39 PM

6IXSTRINGJACK


Oh... lol. You're suggesting that Democrats will fix the problem.

That's funny.




--------------------------------------------------

A government is a body of people usually, notably, governed by Mark Zuckerborg and Slack Dorsey.

Collection of links to Second's, Nilbog's and Marcos' death threats: https://cutt.ly/tkCvEX6

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Thursday, February 25, 2021 9:34 AM

SECOND

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly


Quote:

Originally posted by 6ixStringJack:

Oh... lol. You're suggesting that Democrats will fix the problem.

That's funny.

The Great Texas Power Rip-Off

Two decades ago Texas deregulated its power sector and required 60% of its residents to buy electricity from a retail power company. The other 40% stuck with traditional local utilities. The Wall Street Journal shows us the results:


According to the Journal, retail customers have paid $28 billion more for their power since 2004 than they would have paid at the rates charged to the customers of the state’s traditional utilities:

From 2004 through 2019, the annual rate for electricity from Texas’s traditional utilities was 8% lower, on average, than the nationwide average rate, while the rates of retail providers averaged 13% higher than the nationwide rate, according to the Journal’s analysis.

The Texas Coalition for Affordable Power, a group that buys electricity for local government use, produced similar findings in a study of the state’s power markets and concluded that high statewide prices relative to the national average “must be attributed to the deregulated sector of Texas.”

So what happens now? Probably nothing. In Texas, deregulation is something like a religion: it works by definition, even if it doesn't work. Just give it another 20 years and you'll see.

https://jabberwocking.com/chart-of-the-day-the-great-texas-power-rip-o
ff
/

None of this was supposed to happen under deregulation. Backers of competition in the electricity-supply business promised it would lower prices for consumers.

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly

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Thursday, February 25, 2021 10:21 AM

REAVERFAN


Quote:

Originally posted by 6ixStringJack:
Solar Power is great until the sun isn't out.



Here comes idiot boy, eager to again show us how fucking stupid he is, and he didn't disappoint.

You fucking moron. You don't know shit, and never will. Your brain started out weak, and your drug addictions have just destroyed it even further. You're basically a vegetable. It's a marvel you can remember to breathe.

Give your family (you don't have any friends) what they deserve. Make them rejoice. Kill yourself.

Your entire life is spent pulling on your permanently limp 2" pud, fantasizing about murdering black people for your god Trump.

You're too weak to actually defend yourself, though. You'll be the first to die. We will all toast your death. All of us.

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Thursday, February 25, 2021 10:38 AM

6IXSTRINGJACK


Quote:

Originally posted by reaverfan:
Quote:

Originally posted by 6ixStringJack:
Solar Power is great until the sun isn't out.



Here comes idiot boy, eager to again show us how fucking stupid he is, and he didn't disappoint.

You fucking moron. You don't know shit, and never will. Your brain started out weak, and your drug addictions have just destroyed it even further. You're basically a vegetable. It's a marvel you can remember to breathe.

Give your family (you don't have any friends) what they deserve. Make them rejoice. Kill yourself.

Your entire life is spent pulling on your permanently limp 2" pud, fantasizing about murdering black people for your god Trump.

You're too weak to actually defend yourself, though. You'll be the first to die. We will all toast your death. All of us.



27.




--------------------------------------------------

A government is a body of people usually, notably, governed by Mark Zuckerborg and Slack Dorsey.

Collection of links to Second's, Nilbog's and Marcos' death threats: https://cutt.ly/tkCvEX6

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Thursday, February 25, 2021 1:12 PM

1KIKI

Goodbye, kind world (George Monbiot) - In common with all those generations which have contemplated catastrophe, we appear to be incapable of understanding what confronts us.



This is originally a Bloomberg story. But since Bloomberg's behind a paywall, here's the Yahoo! reprint version.

Quote:

The Two Hours That Nearly Destroyed Texas’s Electric Grid


(Bloomberg) -- The control room of the Texas electric grid is dominated by a Cineplex-sized screen along one wall. As outdoor temperatures plunged to arctic levels around the low-slung building 30 miles from Austin last Sunday night, all eyes were on it. The news wasn’t good.

Electric demand for heat across the state was soaring, as expected, but green dots on the corner state map started flipping to red. Each was a regional power generator, and they were spontaneously shutting down — three coal plants followed quickly by a gas plant in Corpus Christi.

Then another metric began to flash: frequency, a measure of electricity flow on the grid. The 60 hertz needed for stability fell to 59.93.

Bill Magness, chief executive officer of the grid operator, was watching intently and understood instantly what was at stake. Below 59 and the state’s electrical system would face cascading blackouts that would take weeks or months to restore. (All hail the smart grid! kiki) In India in 2012, 700 million people were plunged into darkness in such a moment.

Texas was “seconds and minutes” from such a catastrophe, Magness recalled. It shouldn’t have been happening. After the winter blackouts of 2011, plants should have protected themselves against such low temperatures. The basis of the Texas system is the market — demand soars, you make money. Demand was soaring last Sunday, but the plants were shutting down.

If insufficient power came in, the grid wouldn’t be able to support the energy demand from customers and the other power plants that supply them, causing a cycle of dysfunction. So over the following hours, grid operators ordered the largest forced power outage in U.S. history.

More than 2,000 miles away in San Juan, Puerto Rico, power trader Adam Sinn had been sitting at his computer watching the frequency chart plummet in real time. He knew the dip would be enough to start forcing power plants offline, potentially causing more widespread blackouts. It was an unprecedented situation but, from his perspective, entirely avoidable.

In fact, it was a crisis years in the making. Texas’s power grid ... is famously independent — and insular. Its self-contained grid ... is powered almost entirely in-state with limited import ability ..., thereby allowing the system to avoid federal oversight. ... It’s also an energy-only market, meaning the grid relies on price signals from extreme power prices to spur investments in new power plants, batteries and other supplies.

There is no way to contract power supply to meet the highest demand periods, something known as a capacity market on other grids. There are no mandates or penalties compelling generators to make supply available when it’s needed, or to cold-proof their equipment for storms like the one that slammed Texas last weekend.

So, as the cold began shutting in natural gas supplies, freezing instruments at power plants and icing over wind turbines, there wasn’t enough back-up generation available to meet demand.
As many as 5 million homes and businesses were abruptly thrust into frigid darkness for nearly four straight days as the crisis continued, ensnaring more than a dozen other states as far as away as California and roiling commodity markets across the globe.

Now, as the snow across Texas melts and the lights come back on, answers remain hard to come by. What’s clear is that no one — neither the power plants that failed to cold-proof their equipment nor the grid operator charged with safeguarding the electric system — was prepared for such an extreme weather event. What happened in those two hours highlights just how vulnerable even the most sophisticated energy systems are to the vagaries of climate change, and how close it all came to crashing down.

The warning signs started well before the cold set in. Nearly a week before the blackouts began, the operator of a wind farm in Texas alerted the grid manager, known as Ercot, the Electric Reliability Council of Texas, that ice from the impending storm could force it offline, an early signal that capacity on the system would likely be compromised.

On Thursday, a natural gas trader trying to secure supplies for his company’s power plants for the holiday weekend was surprised to see prices surging. The reason? There were concerns that gas production in West Texas was at risk of freezing off, which would crimp supplies for power generation. And Sinn, the owner of Aspire Commodities, noticed from his computer in San Juan that day-ahead power prices on Texas’s grid were climbing, a sign that the market was anticipating scarcity.

By Saturday, a considerable amount of capacity was already offline, some of it for routine maintenance and some of it due to weather. This is because in Texas peak demand is associated with summer heat so many plants do routine maintenance in winter.

Wind was the first to go, as dense fog settled over turbine fleets, freezing on contact. The slow build-up of moisture over several days caused some of the blades to ice over, while connection lines began to droop under the weight of the ice until power production from some wind farms completely ceased. But because the resource makes up a minor share of Texas’s wintertime power mix, grid operators didn’t view it as a big problem. Then gas generation began declining. That was inconvenient, but not unmanageable. There was still plenty of supply on the system.

On Sunday, the mood in the control room grew tense. As the cold deepened, demand climbed sharply, hitting and then exceeding the state’s all-time winter peak. But the lights stayed on. Magness and his director of system operations, Dan Woodfin, watched the monitors from an adjoining room, satisfied that they had made it through the worst of the crisis.

“We thought maybe we are OK for the rest of the night,” Magness said.

They weren’t.

At 11 p.m., the green dots on the monitor overlooking the control room turned red. Across the state, power plant owners started seeing instruments on their lines freezing and causing their plants to go down. In some cases, well shut-ins (wells where production is turned off - kiki) in West Texas caused gas supplies to dip, reducing pressure at gas plants and forcing them offline. At that point, virtually all of the generation falling off the grid came from coal or gas plants.

“Contrary to some early hot takes, gas and coal were actually the biggest culprits in the crisis,” said Eric Fell, director of North America gas at Wood MacKenzie.


Back in Taylor, the town northeast of Austin, where Ercot is based, orange and red emergency displays began flashing on the giant flat-screens that lined the operators’ workstations.

“It happened very fast — there were several that went off in a row,” Magness said.

In the span of 30 minutes, 2.6 gigawatts of capacity had disappeared from Texas’s power grid, enough to power half a million homes.

“The key operators realized, this has got to stop. This isn’t allowed to happen,” said Magness.


By that point, the temperature outside had fallen to 5 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 15 Celsius). Across the state, streets were icing over and snowbanks piling up. Demand kept climbing. And plants kept falling offline.

No one in the room had anticipated this. And it was about to get worse.

The generation outages were causing frequency to fall — as much as 0.5 hertz in a half-hour. “Then we started to see lots of generation come off,” Magness said.

To stem the plunge, operators would have to start “shedding load.” All at once, control room staff began calling transmission operators across the state, ordering them to start cutting power to their customers.

“As we shed load and the frequency continued to decline, we ordered another block of load shed and the frequency declined further, and we ordered another block of load shed,” said Woodfin, who slept in his office through the crisis.

Operators removed 10 gigawatts of demand from 1:30 a.m. until 2:30 a.m., essentially cutting power to 2 million homes in one fell swoop.


The utility that services San Antonio, CPS Energy, was one of those that got an order to cut power.

“We excluded anything critical, any circuit that had a hospital or police,” CPS chief executive Paula Gold-Williams said Friday. “We kept the airport up.”

Alton McCarver’s apartment in Austin was one of the homes that lost power. The IT worker woke shivering at 2:30 a.m., an hour after the blackouts began, and tried turning up the thermostat. “Even my dog, he was shaking in the house because he was so cold,” he said.

McCarver wanted to take his wife and 9-year-old daughter to shelter with a friend who still had power, but the steep hills around their home were coated in ice and he didn’t think they could make the drive safely. “You’re hungry, you’re frustrated, you’re definitely cold,” he said. “I was mostly worried about my family.”

The power cuts worked — at least in so far as Ercot managed to keep demand below rapidly falling supply.

But the grid operator shed load so rapidly that some generators and market watchers have wondered whether they exacerbated the problem.

What’s more, frequency continued to fluctuate through the early hours of the morning, potentially causing even more power plants to trip, according to Ercot market participants. The Sandy Creek coal plant near Waco was one them, falling offline at 1:56 a.m. in tandem with the frequency dip, according to data from the plant operator.

Ercot, however, maintains that the frequency stayed above the level at which plants would trip.

And as blackouts spread across the state, power was cut not only to homes and businesses but to the compressor stations that power natural gas pipelines — further cutting off the flow of supplies to power plants.


Power supplies became so scarce that what were supposed to be “rolling” blackouts ended up lasting for days at a time, leaving millions of Texans without lights, heat and, eventually without water. Even the Ercot control center lost water, and had to bring in portable toilets for its staff.

“It’s just catastrophic,” said Tony Clark, a former commissioner with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and a senior adviser at law firm Wilkinson Barker Knauer LLP.

By Friday, when Ercot declared that the emergency had ended, 14.4 million people still lacked reliable access to public water supplies, and the crisis had already cost the state $50 billion in damages, according to Accuweather. Meanwhile, some generators made a windfall as energy prices soared to $9,000 a megawatt-hour during the crisis. In all, generators have earned more than $44.6 billion in electricity sales alone this year — more than 2018-2020 combined, according to Wood Mackenzie. Those earnings don’t take into account any hedges that may have been in place.

In the wake of the blackouts, the Public Utility Commission of Texas announced an investigation into the factors that led to the disaster.

But at least the lights were coming back on. In the afternoon, shell-shocked people trickled out of their homes to soak up the sun. “It feels crazy standing outside in the 40 degree sunlight,” said Cassie Moore, a 35-year-old writer and educator, who offered up her shower and washing machine to her boss and friends who were still without power or water. “In this same spot a few days ago I was worried that my dogs might freeze to death.”

—With Javier Blas

(Updates with electricity sales total in third-to-last paragraph. A previous version corrected the individuals responsible for ordering the blackouts in the sixth paragraph and the timing and scope of the generation decline at Sandy Creek coal plant in the 37th paragraph, based on data shared by the plant operator. )

For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com

Subscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.

©2021 Bloomberg L.P.
https://finance.yahoo.com/news/two-hours-nearly-destroyed-texas-130009
983.html



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Thursday, February 25, 2021 1:21 PM

1KIKI

Goodbye, kind world (George Monbiot) - In common with all those generations which have contemplated catastrophe, we appear to be incapable of understanding what confronts us.




This seems to be the crux of the problem: "Texas’s power grid (is) also an energy-only market, meaning the grid relies on price signals from extreme power prices to spur investments in new power plants, batteries and other supplies."

But why use-up profits to build new production, especially when keeping production low and products in short supply means you can jack up sales prices to extreme levels?

This is an oft-repeated failure of 'capitalism'-only economics (even in theory, and most definitely in practice) across many products and markets. When producers/ manufactures/ monopolies/ consortia have a lock on the market and there's no significant competition you get far higher profits by keeping production down.

It's the reasoning behind OPEC, for example - agreements to limit production across producers to keep sales prices high.

So there's no mystery why Texas failed to prepare for cold weather after 2011. It didn't pay then - and it won't pay now.

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Thursday, February 25, 2021 3:41 PM

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The ERCOT grid, Magness said in a separate call yesterday with reporters, was “seconds and minutes” away from a total blackout—an uncontrolled event that, had it happened, later would have required essentially firing it up from dead. The procedure, known in the industry as a “black start,” never has happened in Texas but is the subject of annual ERCOT drills. It would involve activating diesel generators at designated power plants across the state to restart them, gradually reintroducing electricity into nearby power lines, then linking together these re-powered “islands” until the ERCOT grid is back up, Dan Woodfin, ERCOT’s senior director of system operations, explained Friday. “It’s just an incredibly difficult process and takes time,” he said.

Had such a blackout occurred, it would have brought the state to its knees, potentially for weeks or months, an economy that would rank tenth globally if Texas were a country. The emergency required “immediate action,” Magness said, which is why ERCOT began ordering what it terms the “controlled” blackouts that cut off electricity to much of the state.

https://www.texasmonthly.com/politics/texas-blackout-preventable/

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly

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Thursday, February 25, 2021 4:16 PM

1KIKI

Goodbye, kind world (George Monbiot) - In common with all those generations which have contemplated catastrophe, we appear to be incapable of understanding what confronts us.



We get that.

You just can't have power generators providing power as they gear up to speed or wind down, because that messes with the frequency. And considering how big those suckers are, restarting would take a long, long time.


Oh, I was too lazy to look this up earlier, but there is the phase diagram for clathrate (methane hydrate ice):



and converting kpa pressure to the more familiar psig, the charted range is from 0 to ~17,404psig with the first denote at ~2900psig; and converting Celsius to the more familiar Fahrenheit, the range is from ~1.5F to ~95F. The minimum pressure and temperature limits beyond which clathrates will never form appear to be at around ambient pressure and 10F. The recent temperatures in Texas were marginally above the limits for clathrate to exist.


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Thursday, February 25, 2021 5:39 PM

REAVERFAN


Texas’ Libertarian Winter Nightmare
The blackouts and misery of Texas are because of free-market ideology.
https://www.patheos.com/blogs/daylightatheism/2021/02/texas-nightmare-
winter-libertarianism/?utm_source=Newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Imagine+No+Religion&utm_content=44



And let’s be clear: None of this had to happen. This wasn’t unforeseeable or outside our control; it wasn’t human civilization overwhelmed by unstoppable nature. It was, in every sense of the word, a man-made catastrophe. And it happened because of libertarian, free-market ideology run wild.

Start with this fact: Alone among the states, Texas has its own power grid, like an isolated island in the middle of the country. The reason is explicitly ideological. By building a grid that doesn’t cross state lines, Texas avoids federal regulation.

But this also means that in an emergency, it can’t import power from neighboring states. Some outlying regions, like El Paso, connect to the national grid instead of the state grid – and in El Paso, the lights stayed on.

In keeping with its laissez-faire ideology, Texas also doesn’t mandate that power plants prepare for extreme weather. Its regulations are more like gentle suggestions. An operator can be fined for not having a plan, but there are no requirements for what the plan has to say or whether they actually have to do anything to implement it.

They don’t even have the excuse that no one could have seen this coming, because this isn’t the first time that the cold brought Texas to its knees. Just ten years ago, a similar freeze caused similar blackouts, leaving 3 million people in the dark:
----

Face it Russian trolls and trumptards: Your moronic ideology caused it. Nothing else.




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Friday, February 26, 2021 3:27 PM

1KIKI

Goodbye, kind world (George Monbiot) - In common with all those generations which have contemplated catastrophe, we appear to be incapable of understanding what confronts us.



Thanks for agreeing with me.
Quote:

Originally posted by 1KIKI:
This is an oft-repeated failure of 'capitalism'-only economics (even in theory, and most definitely in practice) ...


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Friday, February 26, 2021 7:22 PM

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'Muzzled and eviscerated': Texas Governor Abbott's appointees gutted enforcement of Texas grid rules

A decade ago, after an Arctic cold spell knocked out power and left millions of Texans shivering in the dark, the Public Utility Commission’s enforcement apparatus swung into action. Their aim: punish the companies that had promised but failed to deliver electricity in an emergency.

Specialists contracted by the state agency worked with an enforcement team the utility commission created four years earlier. More recently, it had added lawyers whose only job was to pursue wrong-doing. The energy companies eventually paid fines and settlements totaling hundreds of thousands of dollars for failing to prepare for the extreme weather.

Two weeks ago, history repeated. Millions of residents were left without power and water in below-freezing temperatures. The damage far exceeded the 2011 storm. Nearly a third of the grid’s power plants went offline. Dozens of deaths have been attributed to the event, with a full accounting yet to come.

But the enforcement tools that worked to hold companies accountable for the 2011 failures had been removed under Gov. Greg Abbott’s appointees on the utility commission. Hearst Newspapers reported last week that commissioners in November cut ties with the Texas Reliability Entity — the specialists hired — leaving state regulators without an external independent reliability monitor.

Four months before that, the governor’s commissioners had also disbanded the Oversight & Enforcement Division. The head attorney was told he no longer had a job; nine other team members were reassigned throughout the utility commission.

Several pending cases were dropped. According to commission records, by the end of 2020 the number of enforcement cases had fallen 40 percent.

Critics and former employees say the division was cut precisely because it was working — the state’s most recent move in a 25-year campaign to pare down oversight to favor energy companies and their largest customers, starting when Texas began deregulating its electric market in the 1990s.

The governor’s office disputed that . . .

https://www.houstonchronicle.com/politics/texas/article/critics-abbott
-power-grid-rules-texas-deadly-storm-15982421.php


The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly

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Saturday, February 27, 2021 9:37 AM

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Natural gas distribution needs electricity: About half the gas pipelines use electricity for their compressors, but many were not listed as essential services and have said their power was cut off, creating gas supply problems for power plants.

Two kinds of winterization: Texas lawmakers have long known of the need to winterize Texas power plants, roughly a third of which went offline during the disaster, but natural gas shortages caused by frozen wellheads and power disruptions were the biggest reported hindrance for power plants.

https://www.houstonchronicle.com/politics/texas/article/Texas-lawmaker
s-call-for-Public-Utility-15982430.php


The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly

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Friday, March 5, 2021 7:19 AM

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The prospect of profiting from record-high electricity prices failed to persuade Texas power plants to weatherize operations to prevent last month’s catastrophic power failure.

“Historically, Texas has relied on high prices to ensure reliability,” said Michael Pickens, the global research firm’s associate energy director. “I think the five days that we were in emergency conditions demonstrated that the high prices alone aren’t enough to ensure reliability. We need to go beyond just prices.”

https://www.houstonchronicle.com/business/energy/article/CERAWeek-expe
rts-question-Texas-profit-driven-16001846.php


Texas should winterize its electric generation plants or consider connecting its grid with other parts of the country to help avoid another deadly blackout like the one last month that left people without heat, power or water for days, experts at a top energy conference said on Thursday.

Texas needs better standards for reliability, several experts said. That could include winterizing equipment, requiring natural gas-fueled plants to be able to run on liquid fuels (propane’s boiling point is -43.6°F/-42°C) for five days in case the natural gas system fails to deliver fuel, and connecting its grid with neighbors, they said.

Connecting the Texas grid with neighbors would benefit the state “99% of the time,” Webber said, adding, “We export every form of energy except the electron.”

www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-texas-electricity/texas-will-have-to-wi
nterize-its-grid-or-interconnect-with-neighbors-experts-idUSKBN2AW20W


The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly

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Friday, March 5, 2021 9:27 AM

6IXSTRINGJACK


I bet the ratio of individuals who were prepped for a catastrophe in Texas far outnumbers the ratio of people in California.


--------------------------------------------------

A government is a body of people usually, notably, governed by Mark Zuckerborg and Slack Dorsey.

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Friday, March 5, 2021 11:11 AM

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Quote:

Originally posted by 6ixStringJack:
I bet the ratio of individuals who were prepped for a catastrophe in Texas far outnumbers the ratio of people in California.

You would be wrong if you looked at Texas Trumptards. None were ready. For example: the Trumptard across the street has a Generac natural gas powered electric generator. It came with the house, but didn't start in the cold. I got it to start manually because I can read the manual. Trumptards can also read, but they come to an understanding of what is wrong very slowly or, sometimes, never.

More examples from my street: Two different Trumptards didn't get their sprinkler system vacuum breakers (FEBCO 765-1 PVB) ready for the freeze and they didn't know how to turn off the resulting gusher of water. For one case, I dug into the ground to find the valve. The other case required vise-grips because there was no handle on the shutoff valve. Did I mention that they panicked because of the huge quantities of water flowing down the street? Trumptards only have two modes. 1) Dull-witted paralysis as in the case of the Generac that won't start. 2) Panic as in the case of the water leaks. When in danger or in doubt, run in circles, scream and shout.

Actually there is a third mode: 3) Misunderstand what is obvious to anyone who is NOT a Trumptard.

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly

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Friday, March 5, 2021 11:18 AM

6IXSTRINGJACK


Sounds like stupid people for sure.

I think you're misdiagnosing them because of your political bias.



Oh, and it's March 5th now. You're the Trumptard that keeps bringing up Trump.


What's Biden* up to?


--------------------------------------------------

" 'You're like the Nazis' is the new 'I don't like you'. That disqualifies her from marching around planet Who-Gives-a-Shit in a helmet? ~Bill Maher

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Monday, March 8, 2021 12:41 PM

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A tale of two freezes: How the Texas grid stayed on in the 1989 cold snap.

In the days leading up to Christmas 1989, the deep freeze hung over Texas for days on end, driving temperatures down to 7 degrees in Houston and minus 7 in Abilene. The power stayed on except for a two-hour window of rolling outages.

Flash forward to 2021. A similar but not quite as frigid cold snap left millions of Texans without power for days. More than 40 people died.

How Texas’ power grid became so much less resilient to the cold is a question that will be examined in the months ahead as state and federal officials investigate the blackouts.

Here's what experts are saying made the difference.

On the demand side, 1989 and 2021 were very similar in terms of a rare event that came strikingly close to a summer peak in power usage. But on the supply side, things looked very different.

At the time of the 1989 cold snap, Texas’ power market still operated under a traditional utility model, in which regulated monopolies such as the old Houston Lighting & Power Co. managed the power plants, the transmission lines and then billed the customers — with rates set by state regulators based on how much money companies invested in their system. Each time utilities built backup generation to handle periods of extreme demand, they received a healthy rate of return.

But then in the late 1990s, the Texas Legislature decided to shift to a free market system, in which generators are paid based on how much electricity they sell. The market-based system offered little incentive for power companies to harden their plants against the elements.

The state in 2021 didn’t do what regulators had done in 1989: requiring weatherization.

Also, 2021 gas-fired plants could only burn gas. The 1989 plants were built to be dual fired, so you can burn oil if the gas supply runs low.

When it comes to the events of 1989 and what went right, NERC’s report attributed it to a policy requiring utilities to take a specific series of steps when weather forecasts predict temperatures below 25 degrees, including powering up plants so as to be able to come online in no more than an hour if needed.

In 2021, there were no government requirements and no policies in a free market. It’s up to the market to decide if and when power plants come online.

More at https://www.houstonchronicle.com/business/energy/article/A-tale-of-two
-freezes-How-the-Texas-grid-stayed-16005807.php



The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly

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Monday, March 8, 2021 12:46 PM

6IXSTRINGJACK


You know that when you've spent a year desensitizing everyone with made up Covid death numbers that 40 deaths sounds like nothing, don't you?


--------------------------------------------------

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Monday, March 8, 2021 1:29 PM

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Quote:

Originally posted by 6ixStringJack:
You know that when you've spent a year desensitizing everyone with made up Covid death numbers that 40 deaths sounds like nothing, don't you?

It would be similar to being careless around a table saw, cutting off a finger, then saying it "sounds like nothing" because you have 9 other fingers and 10 toes. Plus there are still other people with all their fingers and toes, so why should you be cautious around a power saw? I think the answer is to never cut off even one finger and never kill even one person by cutting off their electricity out of negligence. Or even cutting off electricity during a freeze to millions of customers because it is far easier and more profitable than keeping the electricity on.

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly

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Monday, March 8, 2021 4:48 PM

SIGNYM

I believe in solving problems, not sharing them.


Quote:

Originally posted by second:
A tale of two freezes: How the Texas grid stayed on in the 1989 cold snap.

In the days leading up to Christmas 1989, the deep freeze hung over Texas for days on end, driving temperatures down to 7 degrees in Houston and minus 7 in Abilene. The power stayed on except for a two-hour window of rolling outages.

Flash forward to 2021. A similar but not quite as frigid cold snap left millions of Texans without power for days. More than 40 people died.

How Texas’ power grid became so much less resilient to the cold is a question that will be examined in the months ahead as state and federal officials investigate the blackouts.

Here's what experts are saying made the difference.

On the demand side, 1989 and 2021 were very similar in terms of a rare event that came strikingly close to a summer peak in power usage. But on the supply side, things looked very different.

At the time of the 1989 cold snap, Texas’ power market still operated under a traditional utility model, in which regulated monopolies such as the old Houston Lighting & Power Co. managed the power plants, the transmission lines and then billed the customers — with rates set by state regulators based on how much money companies invested in their system. Each time utilities built backup generation to handle periods of extreme demand, they received a healthy rate of return.

But then in the late 1990s, the Texas Legislature decided to shift to a free market system, in which generators are paid based on how much electricity they sell. The market-based system offered little incentive for power companies to harden their plants against the elements.

The state in 2021 didn’t do what regulators had done in 1989: requiring weatherization.

Also, 2021 gas-fired plants could only burn gas. The 1989 plants were built to be dual fired, so you can burn oil if the gas supply runs low.

When it comes to the events of 1989 and what went right, NERC’s report attributed it to a policy requiring utilities to take a specific series of steps when weather forecasts predict temperatures below 25 degrees, including powering up plants so as to be able to come online in no more than an hour if needed.

In 2021, there were no government requirements and no policies in a free market. It’s up to the market to decide if and when power plants come online.

More at https://www.houstonchronicle.com/business/energy/article/A-tale-of-two
-freezes-How-the-Texas-grid-stayed-16005807.php



Interesting but mostly irrelevant. Building more power plants when their fuel supply is frozen in the pipes is pointless. I don't't think power utilities have control over their gas suppliers, do they? Did the regulators have authority to require weatherizing nat gas pipes?

Even weatherizing a power plant won't help if the fuel supply is missing. Maybe having dual-fuel plants would have helped if they had heated oil storage tanks on-site. The only kind of power plant that would make sense to weatherize would be nuclear, bc the fuel is there for a long time.

Also, to be clear, the issue was NOT "green energy". Wind power made up only about 15pct of the power mix, and solar - altho vanishingly small- actually continued on as usual. The numerically largest loss of MWH was from nat gas fired plants.

-----------
Pity would be no more,
If we did not MAKE men poor - William Blake

THUGR posts about Putin so much, he must be in love.

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Monday, March 8, 2021 6:58 PM

6IXSTRINGJACK


Quote:

Originally posted by second:
Quote:

Originally posted by 6ixStringJack:
You know that when you've spent a year desensitizing everyone with made up Covid death numbers that 40 deaths sounds like nothing, don't you?

It would be similar to being careless around a table saw, cutting off a finger, then saying it "sounds like nothing" because you have 9 other fingers and 10 toes. Plus there are still other people with all their fingers and toes, so why should you be cautious around a power saw? I think the answer is to never cut off even one finger and never kill even one person by cutting off their electricity out of negligence. Or even cutting off electricity during a freeze to millions of customers because it is far easier and more profitable than keeping the electricity on.

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly



Nah.

It's more like tearing off a hang-nail and getting a boo boo in comparison.


--------------------------------------------------

" 'You're like the Nazis' is the new 'I don't like you'. That disqualifies her from marching around planet Who-Gives-a-Shit in a helmet? ~Bill Maher

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Saturday, March 13, 2021 7:17 AM

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Since the power crisis, the electricity and natural gas industries have engaged in a chicken-and-egg blame game — generators say they couldn’t make electricity because of gas shortages and gas companies say they couldn’t deliver the fuel because of power shortages.

Texas is one of only two states with split regulation over electricity and gas. The Public Utility Commission oversees ERCOT and the electricity industry. The Railroad Commission oversees oil and gas.

In legislative hearings dissecting the power crisis, Christi Craddick, a Republican who chairs the Railroad Commission, said she was unaware that natural gas producers could seek exemptions, like hospitals already have, from rolling outages — exemptions that would have kept gas flowing to power plants.

Power outages left gas processing facilities and pipeline pumps inoperable. The lack of power limited the gas supply, according to Enverus, an energy research firm. Texas natural gas production fell by nearly half during the storm, according to the research and consulting firm IHS Markit. With half as much natural gas to power plants, the output of electricity was also cut in half.

Some larger companies, such as Houston natural gas pipeline company Kinder Morgan, said they took steps after 2011 to gird their equipment against similar storms and did not experience significant disruptions to the flow of gas to power plants. Texas government, however, has no comprehensive data on the measures that the industry completed.

https://web.archive.org/web/20210312124726/https://www.houstonchronicl
e.com/business/energy/article/freeze-risk-texas-natural-gas-supply-system-power-16020457.php


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Saturday, March 13, 2021 7:26 AM

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The state’s grid manager booted two more retail electricity providers from Texas wholesale power markets this week after they failed to make payments to cover their purchases during the recent power crisis.

At least three retail power companies have been banned from participating in the market because they could not cover bills run up when frigid weather and failing power generators drove prices to the state maximum of $9,000 per megawatt hour — more than 300 times average wholesale prices. The Electric Reliability Council of Texas, or ERCOT, ousted Entrust Energy, which owes some $290 million, and Power of Texas, which owes an amount that was not available Friday.

On Friday, San Antonio’s municipal utility CPS Energy sued ERCOT, alleging that the grid manager left power prices too high for too long. CPS ran up a tab of about $1 billion buying natural gas and power at exorbitant prices during the storm.

Just Energy, a Canadian company with more than 350,000 customers in Texas, filed for protection from creditors in Canada this week and said it would seek bankruptcy protection in the United States. Earlier this month, the state's largest electric cooperative, Brazos Electric Power Cooperative, filed for bankruptcy protection in Houston.

Brazos racked up an estimated $2.1 billion in charges over seven days of the freeze, according to its bankruptcy filing. Brazos accounts for about $1.9 billion of ERCOT’s $3.1 billion shortfall.

https://web.archive.org/web/20210313122417/https://www.houstonchronicl
e.com/business/energy/article/More-power-companies-booted-from-the-market-after-16022459.php


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Saturday, March 13, 2021 12:57 PM

REAVERFAN


Quote:

Originally posted by SignyM:
Interesting but mostly irrelevant.

You, OTOH, are entirely uninteresting and completely irrelevant. Do the one and only thing you can do to make the world a better place.



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Monday, March 15, 2021 1:34 PM

SECOND

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly


True Cost of Major Power Outages Remains a Mystery, Report Finds

Very relevant to the recent blackouts in Texas, we find that people aren’t estimating the costs borne by electricity customers of being without power for a long period of time.

Regulations play an important role in this information disparity. The data for grid repairs is so robust in the Texas case study, which focused on two utilities responding to Hurricane Harvey in 2017, because the utilities had to convince regulators of the need to raise rates to recover their costs.

This process in Texas involves hearings, which are sometimes contested. Utilities have to supply significant data to justify charging more.

Texas, and many other states, don’t have regulations in place that mandate utilities to consider human and business interruption costs from being shut down for extended periods due to power outages. According to the report, these costs don’t have a direct impact to the utilities themselves, so there’s no incentive to take them into account.

Utilities are under-investing right now because they are factoring in only their costs and only their benefits. If we could get them to internalize the broader cost to customers and society into their decision-making, then we might see quite a bit more investment in grid resilience.

More at https://www.engr.utexas.edu/news/archive/9183-true-cost-of-major-power
-outages-remains-a-mystery-report-finds


https://eta-publications.lbl.gov/publications/case-studies-economic-im
pacts-power


The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly

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Wednesday, March 17, 2021 7:36 AM

SECOND

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly


Texas' last Public Utility Commission member resigns at Gov. Greg Abbott's request

He is the latest in a long line of officials who have left the PUC or the Electric Reliability Council of Texas since last month's deadly winter storm. At least 57 people died in Texas as a result of the storm — most of them from hypothermia — according to preliminary data the state health department released Monday.

https://www.texastribune.org/2021/03/16/texas-public-utilty-commission
-resignation
/

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly

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Thursday, March 18, 2021 8:22 AM

SECOND

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly


This simple paperwork blunder left Texans cold during the deadly freeze

Dozens of natural gas facilities had not filled out a three-page application for outage exemptions before the storm, meaning their facilities lost power at a moment when their fuel was needed most to feed struggling power plants.

At the height of the “snowpocalypse,” social media teemed with pictures of the power haves and have nots — prompting outrage that vacant downtown office buildings had electricity they didn’t need while average citizens endured teeth-chattering cold or worse.

Former utility regulator Jennifer Hubbs saw those pictures and wondered why her bosses at the Public Utility Commission and her counterparts at the Texas Railroad Commission had not followed through on simple recommendations to keep power flowing to gas suppliers and adopt the emergency procedures she and others proposed years earlier.

“I’m on Twitter and I see a photo of downtown Houston lit up like a freakin’ Christmas tree and all the houses around it dark. It hit me like a physical blow,” she said. “You know, we might have avoided rotating outages entirely if we had just approached it with some sense.”

The final 2012 report Hubbs oversaw — the Texas Energy Assurance Plan — concluded that if the companies that provide fuel for power generation lost power themselves, it could create “cascading” grid failures.

But with no single elected official or bureaucrat in charge of ensuring the two industries work out an emergency plan to keep the power supply chain powered up, the push for voluntary compliance never fully materialized.

When Oncor checked its records during the storm, it found only 35 Permian Basin gas facilities had registered as critical infrastructure to be protected from power shut-offs, Nye said; none had had their power turned off. He said the company added another 168 facilities to the list during the freeze.

A full assessment of how big a role electric power cut to gas facilities played in the grid outages is likely months away. Yet how some of Texas’s largest and most sophisticated energy companies, depended upon by nearly every resident and business, failed to complete a two-minute paperwork chore remains one of the most baffling mysteries of last month’s deadly outages.

Deepening the puzzle is that the same problem was identified during the state’s last major freeze, in 2011. A federal after-incident report concluded that just under a third of production losses in the Permian and Fort Worth areas were caused by outages, mostly power cut to electric pumps on gathering lines at the wellheads. It advised gas and electric companies to close the communication gap so the same thing didn’t happen during the next emergency.

“Gas producers, processors, pipelines, storage providers, and LDCs should identify portions of their systems that are essential to the ongoing delivery of significant volumes of gas, and which are dependent upon purchased power to function reliably under emergency conditions,” it recommended.

As the deep freeze settled over the state a decade later, however, it became clear that the problem remained unfixed.

A fix that costs nothing

The failure of gas and electric companies to communicate with each other — again — demonstrates Texas’s power grid near-collapse last month was an integrated failure spread throughout the system.

Generators and pipeline owners balked at weatherizing their equipment. Lawmakers and regulators neglected to exercise meaningful oversight of the state’s deregulated power industry, leaving it vulnerable to emergencies. Even electric power to the grid’s single biggest fuel source, natural gas, wasn’t secured.

The discovery a decade ago that gas suppliers’ poor communication with power companies had threatened the integrity of the grid prompted a flurry of urgent discussions and meetings about how to assure the electricity would stay on. A follow-up report, the Texas Energy Assurance Plan — a federally funded initiative meant to protect the grid against natural and man-made emergencies — warned that “The reduction or termination of natural gas supply to power plants during critical periods can have dire consequences.”

Discussions of how to improve emergency communications between the state’s gas and electric providers continued into 2013, but then appear to have petered out.

The inability to solve the problem is especially incomprehensible because, unlike many of the other solutions to the state’s grid failure, whose costs are projected to run into the billions of dollars, ensuring that key components of the gas supply chain are protected from outages is virtually cost-free, said Arvind Ravikumar, an assistant professor at Harrisburg University in Pennsylvania.

It’s “not difficult to implement, and it probably wouldn’t have even cost any money,” he said.


https://www.houstonchronicle.com/politics/texas/article/Simple-paperwo
rk-blunder-Texans-cold-winter-storm-16032163.php


The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly

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Sunday, March 21, 2021 8:17 AM

SECOND

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly


This simple paperwork blunder left Texans cold during the deadly freeze

When Texas lawmakers met last month to begin sifting through the wreckage of the state’s energy grid, many expected to hear tales of poorly insulated power plants rendered inoperable by the latest winter storm.

Instead, energy executives raised an even more confounding problem: dozens of natural gas facilities had not filled out a two-page application for outage exemptions before the storm, meaning their facilities lost power at a moment when their fuel was needed most to feed struggling power plants.

“We had basically people calling saying hey, turn a power plant back on, or turn a gas processor back on, and it’s like, it’s too late,” said Curtis Morgan, CEO of Vistra Corp., whose subsidiary, Luminant, is the state’s largest power generator. “You can’t do it when you’re in the middle of it.”

Oncor scrambled to flip power on to more than 150 gas facilities in the Permian Basin after receiving urgent calls from the Public Utility Commission that gas providers needed their power restored, said Allen Nye, chief executive of Texas’s largest electricity delivery company.

The problem, Morgan and Nye said, was that unlike hospitals, 911 call centers and fire stations, many gas production plants had never been identified as “critical” facilities, a designation that could have shielded them from outages during emergencies.

Yet the process of getting a facility designated as critical infrastructure couldn’t be easier. The owner simply needs to fill out the two-page form each year and turn it in to the local utility company.

The same problem was identified during the state’s last major freeze, in 2011. A federal after-incident report concluded that just under a third of production losses in the Permian and Fort Worth areas were caused by outages, mostly power cut to electric pumps on gathering lines at the wellheads. It advised gas and electric companies to close the communication gap so the same thing didn’t happen during the next emergency.

https://www.houstonchronicle.com/politics/texas/article/Simple-paperwo
rk-blunder-Texans-cold-winter-storm-16032163.php


The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly

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Wednesday, March 24, 2021 7:02 AM

SECOND

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly


If the Texas Blackout of 2021 fails to spur transformational change in ERCOT, I’m not sure what will. The Legislature is on track to leave the same old system in place to fail us again.

Almost anyone with a hand in the February fiasco urged lawmakers to tread lightly and avoid overprescribing solutions. So far, the bills that have moved out of committee and are working their way through the Legislature only propose cosmetic changes.

Proponents promise House Bill 11 will mandate weatherization, but all it does is order the Public Utility Commission of Texas to draft a rule requiring electric companies “to prepare generation facilities to provide adequate electric generation service during an extreme weather emergency.”

The bill does not refer to national or international engineering standards, nor does it propose a penalty if a company fails to prepare. The bill is about as vague and toothless as they get.

House Bill 10 reorganizes the ERCOT board to replace five seats historically held by outside energy professionals with five political appointees who live in Texas. The media made a big fuss about how the people who filled those seats lived outside Texas, but based on past hearings, they were the most serious people in the room. More political puppets will not lead to better power plants.

https://www.houstonchronicle.com/business/columnists/tomlinson/article
/Texas-lawmakers-slow-walking-desperately-needed-16047727.php


The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly

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Saturday, March 27, 2021 7:00 AM

SECOND

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly


The history of the state’s all-powerful electricity overseer shows a pattern of failure.

For 20 years, ERCOT has been a misbehaving, secretive, arrogant, even criminal grid operator

More at https://www.dallasnews.com/news/watchdog/2021/03/26/in-20-years-ercot-
has-been-a-misbehaving-secretive-arrogant-even-criminal-grid-operator
/

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly

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Saturday, March 27, 2021 7:00 AM

SECOND

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly


Texas Death Toll In February's Winter Storm Nearly Doubles To 111

The state says the first storm-related deaths took place on Feb. 11, but due to long-term effects, some Texans succumbed to illness and injury as recently as March 11. Some people's medical equipment stopped working without power, cutting them off from lifesaving treatments. Others died of carbon monoxide poisoning as they tried to heat their homes or cars.

February's brutal winter storm exposed massive problems in Texas' power and water systems. It also killed 111 people, according to numbers released Thursday by the Texas Department of State Health Services. That number almost doubles the earlier estimates of at least 57 fatalities as investigators confirmed the cause of more deaths.

More at https://www.npr.org/2021/03/26/981594093/texas-death-toll-in-februarys
-winter-storm-nearly-doubles-to-111


The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly

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Saturday, March 27, 2021 7:21 AM

6IXSTRINGJACK


So .020% of the fake Covid numbers, huh?

A. Buy a generator.
B. Have a reasonable supply of food and toiletries on hand at all times.

Not only won't 99% of those people spend some of their stimmy money on a generator, but I bet if you polled every American right now 95% of them would tell you that they don't have any more paper towels or toilet paper on hand than they did this time a year ago.


--------------------------------------------------

" 'You're like the Nazis' is the new 'I don't like you'. That disqualifies her from marching around planet Who-Gives-a-Shit in a helmet? ~Bill Maher

PSA: Don't click on any links in Second's posts. He's trying to fish your private information out of you.

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Saturday, March 27, 2021 8:39 AM

SECOND

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly


Quote:

Originally posted by 6IXSTRINGJACK:
So .020% of the fake Covid numbers, huh?

A. Buy a generator.
B. Have a reasonable supply of food and toiletries on hand at all times.

Not only won't 99% of those people spend some of their stimmy money on a generator, but I bet if you polled every American right now 95% of them would tell you that they don't have any more paper towels or toilet paper on hand than they did this time a year ago.

You can play the same game with any cause of death. How many died from Glioblastoma multiforme (brain cancer)? Too few to worry about. How many died from the Texas power blackout? Too few to worry about.

https://www.cancercenter.com/cancer-types/brain-cancer/types

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly

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Saturday, March 27, 2021 9:31 AM

6IXSTRINGJACK


Quote:

Originally posted by second:
Quote:

Originally posted by 6IXSTRINGJACK:
So .020% of the fake Covid numbers, huh?

A. Buy a generator.
B. Have a reasonable supply of food and toiletries on hand at all times.

Not only won't 99% of those people spend some of their stimmy money on a generator, but I bet if you polled every American right now 95% of them would tell you that they don't have any more paper towels or toilet paper on hand than they did this time a year ago.

You can play the same game with any cause of death. How many died from Glioblastoma multiforme (brain cancer)? Too few to worry about. How many died from the Texas power blackout? Too few to worry about.

https://www.cancercenter.com/cancer-types/brain-cancer/types

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly



You sure can.

Any death except for fake Covid deaths, of course.



But throw in Demographics and I really couldn't care less. Texas is so far away from me it might as well be on the moon. But honestly, if it's not my family or friends who died, I'm not going to lose any sleep or even post any threads about it if people were dying right in my own back yard. More people get murdered in Chicago every single weekend than died in Texas when it got chilly.

People die. All the time.

All I can say is sorry that your system sucks. Good luck getting it fixed and getting people to start using any good times to prepare for the inevitable bad ones.



--------------------------------------------------

" 'You're like the Nazis' is the new 'I don't like you'. That disqualifies her from marching around planet Who-Gives-a-Shit in a helmet? ~Bill Maher

PSA: Don't click on any links in Second's posts. He's trying to fish your private information out of you.

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Monday, March 29, 2021 7:12 AM

SECOND

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly


Texas leaders, stop asking nicely for industry to secure our power grid. Mandate it.

More than a month after the catastrophic failure of Texas’ power grid, elected officials and political appointees refuse to take true responsibility or move with urgency to fix the problems.

The shameful show of finger-pointing and shallow concern hit the national stage Wednesday as several Texas officials testified before Congress on the impact and causes of February’s storm.

One moment served as a glaring allegory of Texas deflection: Railroad Commission Chairman Christi Craddick was asked whether she, as the state’s top oil and gas regulator, would start requiring operators to fill out a short form that keeps their power from being shut off during outages.

The question by U.S. Rep. Marc Veasey should have been a no-brainer. Craddick herself had testified that in the middle of the blackouts, crews returning to gas fields found they couldn’t restart production because they’d lost power for their equipment. That problem was the result of gas production plant owners not filling out simple paperwork to become designated as “critical facilities,” making them exempt as hospitals are from having their power cut so they can keep supplying fuel to power plants.

Even so, Craddick wouldn’t commit to requiring the form be filled out. Veasey pushed back. Craddick continued to dodge the question. Letting industry police itself is a basic tenant in Texas’ laissez-faire approach to oversight. It’s unclear what kind of burden she thinks filling out a free form that takes about two minutes to complete would impose on companies.

Veasey wasn’t having Craddick’s excuses. “Republicans just want this problem to go away,” he said. “They don’t want to deal with this, they don’t want to require anybody to do anything, which means we’re going to be sitting in the cold again and that is the problem. They are running out the clock.”

Coming from a Democrat, that may sound like partisan rhetoric — except for the fact that the complacency and political cowardice he describes has all happened before. It set the stage for February’s disaster. And it will lead to another tragedy unless lawmakers resolve to finally act this session. Texas oil and gas regulators knew that gas suppliers had their power cut during the state’s last major freeze in 2011. A federal after-incident report had warned that communication gaps between gas and electric companies should be fixed to prevent it from happening again.

A state report in 2012 said the same thing, with regulators at the Texas Public Utility Commission and Railroad Commission concluding that “cascading” grid failures could happen if companies that provide fuel for power generation lost power themselves. That’s exactly what happened in February. It is not government overreach or far-left sabotage to require energy companies to engage in basic emergency planning. It’s the least a government can do to protect its residents from a harsh winter storm.

Lawmakers need to pass safeguards, and elected leaders such as Craddick need to stop leaving Texans’ health and safety to chance and voluntary compliance.

https://www.houstonchronicle.com/opinion/editorials/article/Editorial-
Texas-leaders-do-your-jobs-Stop-16058201.php


The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly

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Monday, March 29, 2021 9:29 AM

6IXSTRINGJACK


Let me know how much that costs.

Then divide it by 11 and tell me when the rest of America is going to have that much money given to them per US citizen.


--------------------------------------------------

" 'You're like the Nazis' is the new 'I don't like you'. That disqualifies her from marching around planet Who-Gives-a-Shit in a helmet? ~Bill Maher

PSA: Don't click on any links in Second's posts. He's trying to fish your private information out of you.

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Tuesday, March 30, 2021 5:49 AM

SECOND

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly


What Really Happened During the Texas Power Grid Outage?



The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly

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