OTHER SCIENCE FICTION SERIES

Who's your favourite villain/villains from any scifi film/tv or Joss Whedon series.

POSTED BY: MRBLUESUN
UPDATED: Sunday, November 26, 2006 18:43
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Tuesday, November 14, 2006 12:04 PM

MRBLUESUN


Hi there! I've just been reading some of the threads posted on this site and there lots of fave TV/Film/Ep threads but none (that i've found) for favourite villain. This is just plain unfair for the bad guys so please tell who yours are!

Mine are as follows:
1. The Operative (Serenity)
2. Agent Smith (from the Matrix series)
3. Wolfram and Hart (from Angel)
4. Spike (Buffy/Angel)
5. The Cylons (Battlestar Galactica [the new one])

"Behold, I have created the smith that bloweth the coals in the fire, and that bringeth forth an instrument for his work; and I have created the waster to destroy."



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Tuesday, November 14, 2006 12:09 PM

SILENCE


Seems to me you don't have Jubal Early on that list.
Does that seem right to you?

**************************
"Listen, if you got guests I can come back later."

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Tuesday, November 14, 2006 1:46 PM

LITTLEALBATROSS29


interesting question.If I had to list 5 I'd say

1- any FF bad guy -who can choose ?

2. Caleb from Buffy - Nathan was one scary villan.

3.The Borg - they are just creepy

4. Any terminator - do I need to say why ?

5.David Xanatos from Gargoyles- he was such a mind trip .I'd be wary of crossing him.

Bryce
*******************************

I swallowed a bug.

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Tuesday, November 14, 2006 2:57 PM

HUGHFF


I know that many of you will groan but:

1) Darth Vader (First trilogy not the wussy prequel) was a seriously cool villain

2) the Daleks - nothing made more kids hide behind the couch than the evil pepperpots.

www.cpfc.org - my life
www.nbhs.school.nz - my work

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Tuesday, November 14, 2006 3:39 PM

PEULSAR5

We sniff the air, we don't kiss the dirt.


And see my No. 1

Keeping in the Joss Whedon universe:
1. Niska
2. Wolfram and Hart
3. Glory
4. Angelus
5. Yosaffbridge

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Tuesday, November 14, 2006 3:53 PM

MURPH


Really had to think about this one. So, I made a list, and here's what I came up with.

1. Spike
2. The Guy with the Keys in E.T. (No... Really!)
3. Niska
4. Burk (Paul Riser's character in "Aliens")
5. The Company Guy in "Outlander"

All we are, is dust in the wind...dude.

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Tuesday, November 14, 2006 5:03 PM

DEEPGIRL187


Quote:

Originally posted by LittleAlbatross29:
5.David Xanatos from Gargoyles- he was such a mind trip .I'd be wary of crossing him.



It's nice to see someone who remembers that. That had to be one of my favorite cartoons growing up.

1. Angelus: How can you not like this guy? He's like, pure unadulterated evil. And how can you argue with someone who clearly enjoys it so much?

2. Pennywhistle The Clown (from Stephen King's It): From a child's perspective, this guy was vile. He knew how to hit where it hurts.

3. Jubal Early: Early had this non-linear way of looking at things while still being very focused on his work. He made you think he was crazy when all the while, he knew exactly what he was doing.

4. Samara (from The Ring): An unrelenting ghost looking for a mother. Pretty frightening stuff if you ask me.

5. The Mayor/YoSaffBridge: You gotta love the cunning and slight craziness of Mrs. Reynolds. I like the Mayor for his conservative, down-home values, and his complete willingness to destroy any one in his way.

*************************************************

"So long and goodnight."

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Wednesday, November 15, 2006 1:21 AM

BULLETINTHEBRAINPANSQUISH


Hi, just wanted to say that, firstly, I'm a newbie to this web-site, I just finished tinkering with my profile.

Okay, I know this sounds weird, but when I was little I always had this irrational fear of the gremlins. Just something about their reaction to water that would completely freak me out whenever I needed to go to the bathroom late at night.

In the world of Joss Whedon though, I'd say the most scary and evil villain would be the First. Complete evil that will inevitably destroy everything.

Although Willow gave it a run for its money.

Mal gives control of the ship to Zoe...
Mal: If I'm not back in an hour, you come, and you rescue me.
Zoe: What? And risk my ship?

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Wednesday, November 15, 2006 2:47 AM

EVILDINOSAUR


My favorite would have to be Jasmine from Angel Season 4. I like the way she fuzzes up the boundary between good and evil.

"Haha, mine is an evil laugh."

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Wednesday, November 15, 2006 11:07 AM

CHRISISALL


My favourite villain was Donald Lydecker from Dark Angel.

And I loved Zod and Ursa from Superman 2 (being released Nov. 28th with a new Richard Donner cut- I am SO there!)

And of course, The Operative.



My short list Chrisisall

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Wednesday, November 15, 2006 5:53 PM

THIEFJEHAT


The skeksis from The Dark Crystal.




Do not fear me. Ours is a peaceful race, and we must live in harmony.

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Thursday, November 16, 2006 7:40 PM

PIRATECAT


Patience, meanest old woman that every rode into a valley. This lady has no code not about business just once to rip you off and has survived doin it by being good hell she owns half of whitefall. Badger can't stand Mal but finds him useful, Fanty and Mingo want reliability, and Niska has a ruthless code abide by it your ok, but Patience thanks for bringin the goods bang your dead I'll keep the change too.

Thats why your on that rusty old boat and I'm running this moon.

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Thursday, November 16, 2006 8:44 PM

BIONICBATMAN


Reavers: You never saw them until Serenity. But in Firefly they were so evil that it makes Jayne afraid. They are the best villains ever!

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Friday, November 17, 2006 4:28 AM

FINN MAC CUMHAL


Darth Vader will always be the ultimate unsympathetic villain. Part of the reason that Ep.I-III didn’t work as well as Ep.IV-VI is because it was so difficult to have any sympathy for Dark Vader.

Although not a movie or television series, I always thought the Mule from Asimov’s Foundation stories was also a magnificent villain.




Nihil est incertius vulgo, nihil obscurius voluntate hominum, nihil fallacius ratione tota comitiorum.

Nothing is more unpredictable than the mob, nothing more obscure than public opinion, nothing more deceptive than the whole political system.

-- Cicero

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Friday, November 17, 2006 12:15 PM

ROXYFREEFALL

Woman, you are completely off your nut.


This is my top...

1) The Operative (Serenity)
2) Aliens (Alien Movies)
3) The Cybermen (Doctor Who)
4) The Emperor (Star Wars)




~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

"Is it you I want, or just the notion of a heart to wrap around so I can find my way around." - Rain ~ Breaking Benjamin
http://www.myspace.com/roxy_freefall

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Friday, November 17, 2006 2:59 PM

TRAVELER


Ming from Mongo. He was evil and insane. His ego was so big he had to conquer the universe so he could have room for it. Niska reminds me of Ming. Both thought they were the toughest villains in the verse.

Ming-"I control absolutely the movement of this planet."

Niska-"Now you know my reputation."

They would make a great team. Eventually one would kill the other. But just wondering which one would get away with it is interesting.


Traveler

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Friday, November 17, 2006 3:32 PM

BROWNCOATJIM


1. The Master (Doctor Who--he just enjoyed it so much!
2. Magneto (X-Men)--you couldn't help but sympathise with him.
3. Michael Meyers--He scared the bejesus out of me!
4. Reavers--need I say more?
5. George A. Romero's zombies

Simon: "Were there any Feds?"
mal: "No, no Feds, just an honest brawl between folk."

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Friday, November 17, 2006 4:02 PM

YINYANG

You were busy trying to get yourself lit on fire. It happens.


Quote:

Originally posted by BulletInTheBrainPanSquish:
Hi, just wanted to say that, firstly, I'm a newbie to this web-site, I just finished tinkering with my profile.



Welcome to the site, BITBPS (long abbreviation )! Has FollowMal found you and gotten you your very own virtual Browncoat yet? Well, don't worry, she'll get around to it.

Now, to my top five villans...

1)Reavers - Joss Whedon creates fear without the viewer ever getting a clear view of them (which adds to the creepy mystique). Sometimes it's just best to let the imaginations of the audience decide what a Reaver looks like to them.

2)Niska - He treated his own nephew like a slab of meat? Don't want to cross him any time soon.

3)Jubal Early - Bone-chilling scene with Kaylee made me dislike him, despite his eccentricities.

4)Blue Hands - I'd rather not bleed to death through my cuticles, thank you very much.

5)Willow (when she was evil, of course) - That episode is one of the few good ones, in my opinion. It made sense, and... she did that freaky thing where she sucked the information right out of the books. Score!

---
"What the world needs now is love, sweet love - it's the only thing that there's just too little of. What the world needs now is love, sweet love. No, not just for some, but for everyone."

http://richlabonte.net/tvvote

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Friday, November 17, 2006 4:29 PM

DOCTROID


I'll just stick to the Firefly universe, because otherwise there are just too many villains too varied to choose from. And because that's not too much of a restriction... the question makes me realize, one of the great things about Firefly is the villains. There are several really, really good ones.

(Looks like there are several different interpretations of the question. Most villainous villains, or the ones we like watching in action best? Sheer villainy isn't all that interesting on its own: the Blue Hands are bad, but not as entertaining as my favorites:)

Top of my list is Yosaffbridge. She's not the evillest, or scariest, or most competent, but she's interesting. Partly because she's such a question mark; you don't know what to believe about her. Was she really married to Durran? Really in love with him? Who knows? We may never. Anyway, I'm always a sucker for con man (or woman) stories. Anyone else here who really enjoyed the movie "Dirty Rotten Scoundrels"?

Right up near the top is the Operative. Sheer genius, to have a monster who knows he's a monster, whose stated purpose is to bring about a utopia in which he has no place. And then to show him that his "utopia" is as monstrous as he is... brilliant. And he's such a polite guy, too.

Niska: well, he could have been just your basic sadist, but casting him with someone who looks like a retired bank clerk makes him special. Jubal Early... I have a hard time watching "Objects in Space", he's so creepy... but he's worth gritting your teeth and watching. (Anyway, it gets so much more fun once the disembodied River starts talking, and, hey, bass clarinet solos!)

And I can't believe no one's mentioned nine other Firefly villains I just thought of myself: Mal, Zoe, Wash, River, Simon, Book, Kaylee, Jayne, and Inara. They steal, they kill, they're bad guys. But we like them. (I thought of letting Inara off this particular hook, but she did participate in stealing the Lassiter. And Book, okay, maybe not a bad guy any more...)

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Friday, November 17, 2006 5:03 PM

EMPIREX


Oh, guys, come on!!! The Cigarette Smoking Man (C.G.B. Spender) from The X-Files???

I can't believe no one picked him! He's manipulative and Evil with a capital E! He tried to murder both of his sons (Mulder and Jeffrey Spender) and he snatched Scully on 2 separate occasions. He's one bad daddy.

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Friday, November 17, 2006 6:16 PM

ETHAN


1. The Operative (Serenity)
2. Raas Alguul (Batman Begins)
3. Tyler Durden (Fight Club)*marginaly scifi
4. The Cylons (new Battlestar Gallactica)
5. Captain Needa this guy had balls!(Empire Strikes Back)
6. Mecha Godzilla (The Terror of Mecha Godzila)
7. Vice Principal Thorn (Teen Wolf)
8. Turlogh (Doctor Who)
9. Diane (V)
10. Rutger Hauer-bot (Blade Runner)

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Friday, November 17, 2006 7:50 PM

MURPH


Quote:

Originally posted by BionicBatman:
Reavers: You never saw them until Serenity. But in Firefly they were so evil that it makes Jayne afraid. They are the best villains ever!



How could I forget the reavers! Holy crap, you are so right!

All we are, is dust in the wind...dude.

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Friday, November 17, 2006 8:27 PM

BIONICBATMAN


Quote:

Originally posted by Murph:
Quote:

Originally posted by BionicBatman:
Reavers: You never saw them until Serenity. But in Firefly they were so evil that it makes Jayne afraid. They are the best villains ever!



How could I forget the reavers! Holy crap, you are so right!

All we are, is dust in the wind...dude.






How could you forget Reavers? You are on a Firefly forum. lol

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Saturday, November 18, 2006 6:15 AM

CYBERSNARK


Thought I'd already done this thread, but that was another forum. Copy'n'pasting:

Naraku, from InuYasha. What makes Naraku truly horrifying for me is his intellect. Yeah, he's a shapeshifter and a demonic cannibal who can extrude parts of himself to become slaves to do his bidding, but his real power is his ability to read people. Naraku knows exactly what buttons to push, and exactly what to say to get people to do whatever he wants them to. Everyone around him is simply a pawn in his game for absolute power. And he's not just a genius either; he's beautifully twisted --a sadistic monster who singles out the ones he can hurt the most, and knows the very best way to twist the knife. It's all part of his plan, as he believes the negative emotions are more powerful than the positive, and the more rage and hatred and despair the Shikon jewel soaks up, the more powerful it will become (and, by extension, the more powerful it will make him when he finally consumes it). He's intentionally causing as much pain and misery as he can around the jewel (and, by association, the show's heroes). And he doesn't make mistakes. If it ever seems like he's making a mistake, like things are turning against him, it's only because that's what he wants it to look like. Other villains might fake their deaths to gain the element of surprise --Naraku actually died, knowing exactly what everyone around him would do. The events of Castle Beyond the Looking Glass were flawlessly orchestrated. The outcome --and Naraku's resurrection-- completely inevitable, given the personalities and natures of all involved. Even in defeat, Naraku won.

Kagura, from InuYasha. She's one of Naraku's spawn, but will stop at nothing to escape him (his death is secondary, what she really wants is Freedom). Like Naraku (having, like Sin from Milton's Satan, inherited the best qualities of her creator), she is an expert "player," and everything and everyone around her is nothing more than a tool. A means to an end, to be used and discarded. She makes alliances, keeps secrets, plots betrayals. . . She is a wind demon, and --like the wind-- she refuses to be tamed. Yet she has no choice, because Naraku knows her as well as he knows himself. Her every betrayal, every secret, every thought is orchestrated. Controlled. She can conceive of nothing except what Naraku wishes, and he's given her just enough lead to realize this (thus causing her no end of anguish and driving her to ever greater heights of treachery as she tries to outsmart him). Naraku hasn't just robbed her of her freedom, but of free will itself. She's not so much a villain, but less even than a victim, with no hope other than to turn her rage and pain outwards --a living weapon in Naraku's control.

Sesshoumaru, from InuYasha. My favourite demon. His name means "perfection in killing," and he lives up to it. No enemy can stand against him, and he routinely slaughters entire armies just to practice a new weapon or technique (or if they just happen to be in his way when he's out for a walk). Not just a demon, but a demon Prince (son of the greatest Demon King --Inu no Taisho), Sesshoumaru is as high above other demons as they are above humans --he regards humans as insects. Barely worth his attention (as I said, not even worth the effort to go around them instead of through them), though, on occassion, entertaining. What gets me about Sesshoumaru is how reasonable he is. He almost never loses his temper, remaining calm and alert at all times. His grudge with InuYasha isn't a matter of being Evil, but (in his mind) a simple matter of law --he (the older brother) wanted InuYasha's sword, and InuYasha (the younger and illegitimate brother) refused. He said no to a Prince. This alone is an offense punishable by death. Of course, the other issues that Sesshoumaru has with InuYasha (blaming him for Father's death, an inferiority complex, simple personal animosity) are all bubbling so far under the surface that even Sesshy himself might not know about them. Then there's Rin. A little human girl who dared to show compassion to Sesshoumaru when he didn't really need it. Compassion is as alien to demons (and to demon Royalty) as wind to a fish, but it intrigued Sesshoumaru enough for him to notice her (which is itself an event). When Rin was murdered by wolves (at the command of one of the show's alleged "heroes" no less), Sesshoumaru revived her, and adopted her (well, he allowed her to tag along, and eventually started actually keeping track of her, and finally protecting her). InuYasha himself tells us that Sesshoumaru isn't capable of love or kindness --that alone is what makes him a monster. Rin's very life is evidence that things are never so clear cut.

Kikyo, from InuYasha (before her second resurrection and becoming a wandering anti-hero). The vampiric, soul-eating miko. Unique among villains because she's explicitly not motivated by anger, or the desire to harm anyone. Kikyo is driven by Love. True Love, the kind that can change peoples' lives, and that most people spend their lives seeking and barely glimpse. Kikyo loves InuYasha, and can't bear to be apart from him. Yet, like Kagura, Kikyo has no choice. He's a half-demon, and she's a priestess, and true love really doesn't conquer all. They can never be together in life, so she shall join him in death. As a priestess, she knows better than anyone that, as one of the undead, she is banned from anything resembling Heaven. She (in the dub, at least) takes on aspects of Milton's Satan --echoing his famous "Hell of Heav'n" speech ("Better to rule in Hell than serve in Heaven") as she swears that her Love could make a Heaven of Hell. Kikyo's specific plan changes throughout the series, reacting to what she learns and what the other characters do (which right there makes her more interesting than most "scheme of the week" types). At first it's simply to kill InuYasha, but once she learns of the effect Kagome has had on him (treating him like a good man, and thus making him want to be a good man), she realizes that his damnation is no longer assured. She makes a deliberate and conscious choice to embrace Evil, and to turn InuYasha to Evil as well (all the better if Kagome dies along the way --Jealousy is to evil as Love is to good). Also, Kikyo's newly amoral nature is intoxicating to her. She comments that she's never felt as alive as she does now that she's dead, and (believes herself) exempt from the spiritual morality of punishment/reward (what's the point of doing good if you're damned anyway?).

And of course, there's InuYasha himself. InuYasha is no Prince Charming. Blood soaks his hands, and a part of him enjoys it. On occasion, his demonic half takes over, leaving him as a savage who destroys all in his path (including innocent bystanders and even his own friends and loved ones). He's not mindless in this form; he's still articulate and cunning. He knows what he's doing, can remember it (he doesn't seem to at first, but we eventually learn that he's been repressing it), but he just doesn't care. Like an addiction, he can't stop himself (until his human mind reasserts itself and he has to deal with the consequences). This is the root of his trouble with people; anyone who gets close to him, anyone he allows himself to care about, is just another potential victim. He could rip his beloved apart with his bare hands, and laugh while doing it --so he can't allow himself love (even when he knows Kagome loves him). His full-demon form is a point of conflict between Kikyo and Sesshoumaru; she wants him to give in to it, and become a monster, while Sesshoumaru's plan requires InuYasha to understand his nature and feel remorse for his "crime" (i.e., his very existence) which requires a rational mind. This means that, on occasion, one or the other will actually end up helping InuYasha against the other.

Demona, from Gargoyles. Demona is a genocidal psychopath, but what makes her stand out is her justification. Humans have mistreated gargoyles since both species evolved, and Demona's actions are motivated by a sort of twisted patriotism --vengeance for the attempted genocide of her race. The fact that she's the ex-lover of the show's hero (and the mother of his child) doesn't hurt (then there's the poetry of Demona's daughter being called Angela). She's highly intelligent, but (unlike some evil geniuses) isn't averse to getting her claws dirty: she has over 1,000 years of fighting experience, and it shows --not just in hand-to-hand, but with the latest highly-advanced weaponry and everything in between. Equal parts sorceress and scientist, Demona even runs her own multinational corporation (Nightstone Unlimited) as a front for her weapons-manufacturing R&D work. If Kikyo reminds me of the Miltonic Satan, then Demona evokes Faust; selling her soul for the immortality to exact vengeance. Of course, it's impossible to discuss Demona without invoking the Hunters ("there will always be a Hunter. . . and there will always be the Hunted"). The Hunters are the bloodline of a Scottish boy Demona once maimed almost 1,000 years ago, each generation trained and pledged to destroy her and her "demonic" kind, no matter the cost. Between the two of them, Demona and the Hunters define the concept of "monster" --utterly unable to accept their own guilt, instead transposing it onto their enemies. ("NO! What have I. . . What have they done to you?!?")

David Xanatos, from Gargoyles. Xanatos is perhaps the most multifacetted, complex villain in cartoon history (certainly in the Disney canon, no one else even comes close). Simply put, he wants to live forever. The product of a self-fulfilling prophecy (the adult Xanatos travelled back in time and left a note for his younger self, who used the knowledge it revealed to build an empire), and the founder and owner of Xanatos Enterprises. Xanatos has a genius-level IQ, yet enjoys the physical aspects of combat (where Demona uses violence as a tool, Xanatos actively seeks out confrontation with his enemies --he actually likes the Gargoyles, because his typical foes are only found in boardrooms and offices). If he were less intelligent, or had been born a few centuries earlier, he'd be a general or a warlord. Instead, he's a multi-billionaire with a fondness for rough sports --sort of like an evil Bruce Wayne. He's also one of the only villains I've seen who manages to redeem himself without losing his edge, and without being immediately trusted by the heroes. After terrorizing the gargoyles and establishing himself as their most ruthless foe, Xanatos falls in love, gets married, then becomes a father. To everyone's surprise, he turns out to be a good father. Everything that he's done and acquired in his hunt for immortality has now become superfluous. He's found immortality; the only immortality that any human needs. . . or deserves.

Prince Zuko, from Avatar: The Last Airbender. A Firebender (i.e., a mage, able to bend fire to his will), he's also a master martial artist. Like Xanatos, Zuko is a multifacetted villain; an exiled prince who wants to capture the Avatar to regain his station. He is brutal, violent, and very, very angry (much like his abusive father), but there are kernels of compassion and heroism beneath his rage. He has lost everything he's ever had, and is regaining his life through brutal determination --this is the only life possible for him. The entire universe seems to want him dead, but no matter how badly he is scarred, wounded, or tortured, he. Will. Not. Stop. The dichotomy between Zuko and his sister motivates everything he's ever done. ("Father said she was born lucky. He says I was lucky to be born.")

Azula, Zuko's sister in Avatar. As Uncle Iroh says: "She's crazy, and she needs to go down." Nothing complicated or ambiguous here: Azula is a psychopath --father's favourite, 'cause he interprets cruelty as strength. She has no mercy or compassion in her; even as a child, she lied, stole, and viciously beat anyone who crossed her. She's out to kill the Avatar, and her brother, for no real reason other than because it's "fun." An even more skilled firebender than her brother, Azula may also be the superior fighter. What makes Azula scary is her utter skill and cruelty. Unlike the Operative, she won't kill children because she has to; she'll kill them because she can.

Scorpius, from Farscape. Scorpy is just ruthless. Highly intelligent and focused, but not without a certain animal passion. He's the product of a rape between a heat-generating Scarran and a cold-blooded Sebacean woman, so his very body is trying to destroy itself (his Scarran blood generates incredible heat, and he needs his built-in life-support systems to keep his temperature down --the fire of his birth is what killed his mother). Scorpius' entire existence is focused on a single goal; extermination of the Scarrans. To that end lives, technology, worlds, entire species are only means to an end. Unlike many villains, Scorpius doesn't bluff. He will commit atrocities and even sacrifice himself in pursuit of his goal. In his way, he can be as cruel as Naraku, but with Scorpius it's never personal (except against the Scarrans). In fact, he goes out of his way to protect his allies, if only because his plan calls for their survival --he's equally capable of torture (both physical and psychological). He is a hard leader, but (unlike Vader) fair. Competence and loyalty are amply rewarded, honest failures are tolerated (though treachery is dealt with in the most. . . efficient manner).

Shinzon, from Star Trek Nemesis. Shinzon makes the list by simple virtue of his relation to Picard. Every franchise has tried the "evil twin" archetype (Star Trek more than most), but Nemesis did it best. Shinzon is Picard, in every way except one. Picard was lucky. Born into a family that loved him, in a society governed by the best impulses of civilization, with Starfleet to guide and inspire his genius, Picard became Starfleet's finest Captain --intelligent, erudite, courageous, and compassionate. Shinzon. . . didn't. Raised and abused in darkness, tormented by a monolithic Empire built on the backs of oppressed slaves, Shinzon became a monster --cunning, charismatic, daring, and passionately loyal to his adopted people. This is Shinzon's only redeeming quality, his love for the Remans, the same love that Picard feels for the Federation and its principles. To Picard, this love is turned outward, and he travels the stars helping strangers. Shinzon's love is cruel and paranoid, and he takes to the stars to destroy his enemies --enemies who would save him if he allowed them to. He is Picard's twisted reflection, and the conflict between them cuts to the core of what Star Trek (at its best) has always been about --can we change? Do we have the capacity to live up to our better natures, or are we nothing more than the results of the forces that shaped us? Is there any reason for Hope, or just fatalistic Despair? Shinzon fails this test; the Reman mines made him a monster, and that is all he can ever be. Nemesis is a horror film, not because of the Nosferatu-inspired Remans, but because of Shinzon's tragic nature.

Angelus, from Angel. Like InuYasha, Angelus is the dark side of the hero, but Joss takes it in a different direction. Instead of being a periodic monster, Angelus stayed around for a whole year (and remains a presence even when Angel is in complete control). What makes Angelus stand out is his connection to the heroes --he knows exactly what will terrorize Buffy and her friends, and delights in tormenting them, knowing all the while that they don't have the guts to just kill him (because they think they can bring Angel back). He's not particularly smart, but he toys with them like a cat torturing a mouse before the kill. And Buffy can't even kill him --he's beyond her reach. Instead, she ends up killing her lover.

The Operative, from Serenity. The first we meet him, he tells us that he has no name or rank --like the secret "Academy," he does not exist. Inara later notes that he's a believer --a believer in the Alliance. To the Operative, the rigid laws of the Alliance represent the only acceptable path, and whatever sins he must perform are justified. He harbours no delusions about his purity though; he knows that he's a monster. He doesn't want to be, but he sacrifices his life, his name, and his very soul to create a better world, a world where creatures like him can not exist. If nothing else, the Operative represents the epitome of "Civilization," and leaving him to witness the outcome of that civilization ("a world without sin") was the cruellest thing Mal could have done.

Jubal Early, from Firefly. Early is. . . not quite right. He's human, but more alien than anything you're like to find in Star Trek. It's hard to guess how intelligent he may be, because his mind seems ever so slightly unhinged. He's not wacky or hyperactive, like the typical crazy-type (Joker, we're looking at you), but incredibly creepy. He's quite calm, even articulate. Everything's tightly controlled, restrained, but with an underlying current of insanity. He's a philosopher, always taking a moment to mull over the implications of terms and expressions that others simply gloss over (whether or not it's still someone's room when they're not in it --what's the difference between occupying a place and possessing it?), and even his momentary lapses in concentration betray a brilliant and thoughtful mind. River pegs him as a sociopath; a serial killer with obsessive-compulsive traits (killed a dog as a child, then cleaned everything up. No one ever found out).

Sims, from Jeremiah. Sims is a pawn in a much bigger game, but doesn't care. Like the Operative, Sims is a Believer, a remorseless killer in the name of a greater good. What makes him dangerous is that his religious faith is tempered by intelligence. When it is revealed to him that "Daniel" (the spiritual leader to which Sims has pledged his allegiance) does not exist (and that Sims has therefore been lied to), he accepts it, but doesn't care. "Pretty girl tells you you're handsome, doesn't matter whether it's true or not. You walk a little straighter, stand a little taller." Sims accepts the lie, because his faith gives him Comfort and Hope, even if it isn't Truth. And if that religion tells him to destroy his enemies, he will do it. It is simply his duty.

Moriarty, as written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. I'm not talking about any of the myriad of film and TV versions, but the original character as written in "The Final Problem." We (via Watson's account) never meet Moriarty face to face except when he's in disguise, so all we know of him comes through Holmes' anecdotal description. Holmes is typically sparing with his praise and swift with criticism, but even he is clearly impressed by Moriarty's genius. Ultimately, we never need to meet Moriarty --Holmes' description makes him far more terrifying than any direct appearance could. His is the hand that has directed seemingly the entire criminal world, orchestrating everything from assassins to pickpockets --and by extension, Holmes himself as he investigates the crimes. Moriarty is cultured and educated --like InuYasha's Naraku, but more genteel, and with a worthier foe.

The Jaffa, on Stargate SG-1. While not a single enemy, the Jaffa have a favoured place as an example of how to write an army of highly-skilled troops (with Star Wars' Stormtroopers as an example of how not to do it). Jaffa and Stormtroopers are both supposed to be the elite shock troops of their respective empires, but where the Stormtroopers are remembered as lightweight "generics" who can't shoot straight, the Jaffa are never less than a genuine threat. Simply put, the Jaffa, on occasion, win. Their weapons are far more powerful, their strategies much more advanced, their equipment unmatched by anything on Earth, and their effectiveness unquestioned. When confronted, the SG forces have no choice but to retreat, outsmart them, or die. Any open battle results in massive casualties, and the SGC is perpetually only a step ahead of them. The heroes must plan strategically, careful to pick their battles. The only edge the SGC has is psychological --the Jaffa are rigidly trained, but the Tau-ri can be more creative than the Jaffa are equipped to deal with. And then there're Anubis' Cull warriors, who are downright nightmare-inducing --bulletproof, implacable, adaptable, and relentlessly cunning. Just one super-soldier is too many for the SGC to deal with.

-----
We applied the cortical electrodes but were unable to get a neural reaction from either patient.

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Saturday, November 18, 2006 6:30 AM

JWHEDONADDICT


1.Faith
2.Angelus
3.Drusilla
4.the Operative
5.Wolfram and Hart

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Sunday, November 19, 2006 2:18 PM

BROWNCOATJIM


I agree with what you say about the Reavers. Imagination makes them that much scarier. That's why I picked Michael Meyers-- I thought the original Halloween was so scary, because you barely saw him until the end. (I saw it at just way too young of an age!)

Simon: "Were there any Feds?"
mal: "No, no Feds, just an honest brawl between folk."

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Sunday, November 19, 2006 2:33 PM

KANEMAN


Quote:

Originally posted by Cybersnark:
Thought I'd already done this thread, but that was another forum. Copy'n'pasting:

Naraku, from InuYasha. What makes Naraku truly horrifying for me is his intellect. Yeah, he's a shapeshifter and a demonic cannibal who can extrude parts of himself to become slaves to do his bidding, but his real power is his ability to read people. Naraku knows exactly what buttons to push, and exactly what to say to get people to do whatever he wants them to. Everyone around him is simply a pawn in his game for absolute power. And he's not just a genius either; he's beautifully twisted --a sadistic monster who singles out the ones he can hurt the most, and knows the very best way to twist the knife. It's all part of his plan, as he believes the negative emotions are more powerful than the positive, and the more rage and hatred and despair the Shikon jewel soaks up, the more powerful it will become (and, by extension, the more powerful it will make him when he finally consumes it). He's intentionally causing as much pain and misery as he can around the jewel (and, by association, the show's heroes). And he doesn't make mistakes. If it ever seems like he's making a mistake, like things are turning against him, it's only because that's what he wants it to look like. Other villains might fake their deaths to gain the element of surprise --Naraku actually died, knowing exactly what everyone around him would do. The events of Castle Beyond the Looking Glass were flawlessly orchestrated. The outcome --and Naraku's resurrection-- completely inevitable, given the personalities and natures of all involved. Even in defeat, Naraku won.

Kagura, from InuYasha. She's one of Naraku's spawn, but will stop at nothing to escape him (his death is secondary, what she really wants is Freedom). Like Naraku (having, like Sin from Milton's Satan, inherited the best qualities of her creator), she is an expert "player," and everything and everyone around her is nothing more than a tool. A means to an end, to be used and discarded. She makes alliances, keeps secrets, plots betrayals. . . She is a wind demon, and --like the wind-- she refuses to be tamed. Yet she has no choice, because Naraku knows her as well as he knows himself. Her every betrayal, every secret, every thought is orchestrated. Controlled. She can conceive of nothing except what Naraku wishes, and he's given her just enough lead to realize this (thus causing her no end of anguish and driving her to ever greater heights of treachery as she tries to outsmart him). Naraku hasn't just robbed her of her freedom, but of free will itself. She's not so much a villain, but less even than a victim, with no hope other than to turn her rage and pain outwards --a living weapon in Naraku's control.

Sesshoumaru, from InuYasha. My favourite demon. His name means "perfection in killing," and he lives up to it. No enemy can stand against him, and he routinely slaughters entire armies just to practice a new weapon or technique (or if they just happen to be in his way when he's out for a walk). Not just a demon, but a demon Prince (son of the greatest Demon King --Inu no Taisho), Sesshoumaru is as high above other demons as they are above humans --he regards humans as insects. Barely worth his attention (as I said, not even worth the effort to go around them instead of through them), though, on occassion, entertaining. What gets me about Sesshoumaru is how reasonable he is. He almost never loses his temper, remaining calm and alert at all times. His grudge with InuYasha isn't a matter of being Evil, but (in his mind) a simple matter of law --he (the older brother) wanted InuYasha's sword, and InuYasha (the younger and illegitimate brother) refused. He said no to a Prince. This alone is an offense punishable by death. Of course, the other issues that Sesshoumaru has with InuYasha (blaming him for Father's death, an inferiority complex, simple personal animosity) are all bubbling so far under the surface that even Sesshy himself might not know about them. Then there's Rin. A little human girl who dared to show compassion to Sesshoumaru when he didn't really need it. Compassion is as alien to demons (and to demon Royalty) as wind to a fish, but it intrigued Sesshoumaru enough for him to notice her (which is itself an event). When Rin was murdered by wolves (at the command of one of the show's alleged "heroes" no less), Sesshoumaru revived her, and adopted her (well, he allowed her to tag along, and eventually started actually keeping track of her, and finally protecting her). InuYasha himself tells us that Sesshoumaru isn't capable of love or kindness --that alone is what makes him a monster. Rin's very life is evidence that things are never so clear cut.

Kikyo, from InuYasha (before her second resurrection and becoming a wandering anti-hero). The vampiric, soul-eating miko. Unique among villains because she's explicitly not motivated by anger, or the desire to harm anyone. Kikyo is driven by Love. True Love, the kind that can change peoples' lives, and that most people spend their lives seeking and barely glimpse. Kikyo loves InuYasha, and can't bear to be apart from him. Yet, like Kagura, Kikyo has no choice. He's a half-demon, and she's a priestess, and true love really doesn't conquer all. They can never be together in life, so she shall join him in death. As a priestess, she knows better than anyone that, as one of the undead, she is banned from anything resembling Heaven. She (in the dub, at least) takes on aspects of Milton's Satan --echoing his famous "Hell of Heav'n" speech ("Better to rule in Hell than serve in Heaven") as she swears that her Love could make a Heaven of Hell. Kikyo's specific plan changes throughout the series, reacting to what she learns and what the other characters do (which right there makes her more interesting than most "scheme of the week" types). At first it's simply to kill InuYasha, but once she learns of the effect Kagome has had on him (treating him like a good man, and thus making him want to be a good man), she realizes that his damnation is no longer assured. She makes a deliberate and conscious choice to embrace Evil, and to turn InuYasha to Evil as well (all the better if Kagome dies along the way --Jealousy is to evil as Love is to good). Also, Kikyo's newly amoral nature is intoxicating to her. She comments that she's never felt as alive as she does now that she's dead, and (believes herself) exempt from the spiritual morality of punishment/reward (what's the point of doing good if you're damned anyway?).

And of course, there's InuYasha himself. InuYasha is no Prince Charming. Blood soaks his hands, and a part of him enjoys it. On occasion, his demonic half takes over, leaving him as a savage who destroys all in his path (including innocent bystanders and even his own friends and loved ones). He's not mindless in this form; he's still articulate and cunning. He knows what he's doing, can remember it (he doesn't seem to at first, but we eventually learn that he's been repressing it), but he just doesn't care. Like an addiction, he can't stop himself (until his human mind reasserts itself and he has to deal with the consequences). This is the root of his trouble with people; anyone who gets close to him, anyone he allows himself to care about, is just another potential victim. He could rip his beloved apart with his bare hands, and laugh while doing it --so he can't allow himself love (even when he knows Kagome loves him). His full-demon form is a point of conflict between Kikyo and Sesshoumaru; she wants him to give in to it, and become a monster, while Sesshoumaru's plan requires InuYasha to understand his nature and feel remorse for his "crime" (i.e., his very existence) which requires a rational mind. This means that, on occasion, one or the other will actually end up helping InuYasha against the other.

Demona, from Gargoyles. Demona is a genocidal psychopath, but what makes her stand out is her justification. Humans have mistreated gargoyles since both species evolved, and Demona's actions are motivated by a sort of twisted patriotism --vengeance for the attempted genocide of her race. The fact that she's the ex-lover of the show's hero (and the mother of his child) doesn't hurt (then there's the poetry of Demona's daughter being called Angela). She's highly intelligent, but (unlike some evil geniuses) isn't averse to getting her claws dirty: she has over 1,000 years of fighting experience, and it shows --not just in hand-to-hand, but with the latest highly-advanced weaponry and everything in between. Equal parts sorceress and scientist, Demona even runs her own multinational corporation (Nightstone Unlimited) as a front for her weapons-manufacturing R&D work. If Kikyo reminds me of the Miltonic Satan, then Demona evokes Faust; selling her soul for the immortality to exact vengeance. Of course, it's impossible to discuss Demona without invoking the Hunters ("there will always be a Hunter. . . and there will always be the Hunted"). The Hunters are the bloodline of a Scottish boy Demona once maimed almost 1,000 years ago, each generation trained and pledged to destroy her and her "demonic" kind, no matter the cost. Between the two of them, Demona and the Hunters define the concept of "monster" --utterly unable to accept their own guilt, instead transposing it onto their enemies. ("NO! What have I. . . What have they done to you?!?")

David Xanatos, from Gargoyles. Xanatos is perhaps the most multifacetted, complex villain in cartoon history (certainly in the Disney canon, no one else even comes close). Simply put, he wants to live forever. The product of a self-fulfilling prophecy (the adult Xanatos travelled back in time and left a note for his younger self, who used the knowledge it revealed to build an empire), and the founder and owner of Xanatos Enterprises. Xanatos has a genius-level IQ, yet enjoys the physical aspects of combat (where Demona uses violence as a tool, Xanatos actively seeks out confrontation with his enemies --he actually likes the Gargoyles, because his typical foes are only found in boardrooms and offices). If he were less intelligent, or had been born a few centuries earlier, he'd be a general or a warlord. Instead, he's a multi-billionaire with a fondness for rough sports --sort of like an evil Bruce Wayne. He's also one of the only villains I've seen who manages to redeem himself without losing his edge, and without being immediately trusted by the heroes. After terrorizing the gargoyles and establishing himself as their most ruthless foe, Xanatos falls in love, gets married, then becomes a father. To everyone's surprise, he turns out to be a good father. Everything that he's done and acquired in his hunt for immortality has now become superfluous. He's found immortality; the only immortality that any human needs. . . or deserves.

Prince Zuko, from Avatar: The Last Airbender. A Firebender (i.e., a mage, able to bend fire to his will), he's also a master martial artist. Like Xanatos, Zuko is a multifacetted villain; an exiled prince who wants to capture the Avatar to regain his station. He is brutal, violent, and very, very angry (much like his abusive father), but there are kernels of compassion and heroism beneath his rage. He has lost everything he's ever had, and is regaining his life through brutal determination --this is the only life possible for him. The entire universe seems to want him dead, but no matter how badly he is scarred, wounded, or tortured, he. Will. Not. Stop. The dichotomy between Zuko and his sister motivates everything he's ever done. ("Father said she was born lucky. He says I was lucky to be born.")

Azula, Zuko's sister in Avatar. As Uncle Iroh says: "She's crazy, and she needs to go down." Nothing complicated or ambiguous here: Azula is a psychopath --father's favourite, 'cause he interprets cruelty as strength. She has no mercy or compassion in her; even as a child, she lied, stole, and viciously beat anyone who crossed her. She's out to kill the Avatar, and her brother, for no real reason other than because it's "fun." An even more skilled firebender than her brother, Azula may also be the superior fighter. What makes Azula scary is her utter skill and cruelty. Unlike the Operative, she won't kill children because she has to; she'll kill them because she can.

Scorpius, from Farscape. Scorpy is just ruthless. Highly intelligent and focused, but not without a certain animal passion. He's the product of a rape between a heat-generating Scarran and a cold-blooded Sebacean woman, so his very body is trying to destroy itself (his Scarran blood generates incredible heat, and he needs his built-in life-support systems to keep his temperature down --the fire of his birth is what killed his mother). Scorpius' entire existence is focused on a single goal; extermination of the Scarrans. To that end lives, technology, worlds, entire species are only means to an end. Unlike many villains, Scorpius doesn't bluff. He will commit atrocities and even sacrifice himself in pursuit of his goal. In his way, he can be as cruel as Naraku, but with Scorpius it's never personal (except against the Scarrans). In fact, he goes out of his way to protect his allies, if only because his plan calls for their survival --he's equally capable of torture (both physical and psychological). He is a hard leader, but (unlike Vader) fair. Competence and loyalty are amply rewarded, honest failures are tolerated (though treachery is dealt with in the most. . . efficient manner).

Shinzon, from Star Trek Nemesis. Shinzon makes the list by simple virtue of his relation to Picard. Every franchise has tried the "evil twin" archetype (Star Trek more than most), but Nemesis did it best. Shinzon is Picard, in every way except one. Picard was lucky. Born into a family that loved him, in a society governed by the best impulses of civilization, with Starfleet to guide and inspire his genius, Picard became Starfleet's finest Captain --intelligent, erudite, courageous, and compassionate. Shinzon. . . didn't. Raised and abused in darkness, tormented by a monolithic Empire built on the backs of oppressed slaves, Shinzon became a monster --cunning, charismatic, daring, and passionately loyal to his adopted people. This is Shinzon's only redeeming quality, his love for the Remans, the same love that Picard feels for the Federation and its principles. To Picard, this love is turned outward, and he travels the stars helping strangers. Shinzon's love is cruel and paranoid, and he takes to the stars to destroy his enemies --enemies who would save him if he allowed them to. He is Picard's twisted reflection, and the conflict between them cuts to the core of what Star Trek (at its best) has always been about --can we change? Do we have the capacity to live up to our better natures, or are we nothing more than the results of the forces that shaped us? Is there any reason for Hope, or just fatalistic Despair? Shinzon fails this test; the Reman mines made him a monster, and that is all he can ever be. Nemesis is a horror film, not because of the Nosferatu-inspired Remans, but because of Shinzon's tragic nature.

Angelus, from Angel. Like InuYasha, Angelus is the dark side of the hero, but Joss takes it in a different direction. Instead of being a periodic monster, Angelus stayed around for a whole year (and remains a presence even when Angel is in complete control). What makes Angelus stand out is his connection to the heroes --he knows exactly what will terrorize Buffy and her friends, and delights in tormenting them, knowing all the while that they don't have the guts to just kill him (because they think they can bring Angel back). He's not particularly smart, but he toys with them like a cat torturing a mouse before the kill. And Buffy can't even kill him --he's beyond her reach. Instead, she ends up killing her lover.

The Operative, from Serenity. The first we meet him, he tells us that he has no name or rank --like the secret "Academy," he does not exist. Inara later notes that he's a believer --a believer in the Alliance. To the Operative, the rigid laws of the Alliance represent the only acceptable path, and whatever sins he must perform are justified. He harbours no delusions about his purity though; he knows that he's a monster. He doesn't want to be, but he sacrifices his life, his name, and his very soul to create a better world, a world where creatures like him can not exist. If nothing else, the Operative represents the epitome of "Civilization," and leaving him to witness the outcome of that civilization ("a world without sin") was the cruellest thing Mal could have done.

Jubal Early, from Firefly. Early is. . . not quite right. He's human, but more alien than anything you're like to find in Star Trek. It's hard to guess how intelligent he may be, because his mind seems ever so slightly unhinged. He's not wacky or hyperactive, like the typical crazy-type (Joker, we're looking at you), but incredibly creepy. He's quite calm, even articulate. Everything's tightly controlled, restrained, but with an underlying current of insanity. He's a philosopher, always taking a moment to mull over the implications of terms and expressions that others simply gloss over (whether or not it's still someone's room when they're not in it --what's the difference between occupying a place and possessing it?), and even his momentary lapses in concentration betray a brilliant and thoughtful mind. River pegs him as a sociopath; a serial killer with obsessive-compulsive traits (killed a dog as a child, then cleaned everything up. No one ever found out).

Sims, from Jeremiah. Sims is a pawn in a much bigger game, but doesn't care. Like the Operative, Sims is a Believer, a remorseless killer in the name of a greater good. What makes him dangerous is that his religious faith is tempered by intelligence. When it is revealed to him that "Daniel" (the spiritual leader to which Sims has pledged his allegiance) does not exist (and that Sims has therefore been lied to), he accepts it, but doesn't care. "Pretty girl tells you you're handsome, doesn't matter whether it's true or not. You walk a little straighter, stand a little taller." Sims accepts the lie, because his faith gives him Comfort and Hope, even if it isn't Truth. And if that religion tells him to destroy his enemies, he will do it. It is simply his duty.

Moriarty, as written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. I'm not talking about any of the myriad of film and TV versions, but the original character as written in "The Final Problem." We (via Watson's account) never meet Moriarty face to face except when he's in disguise, so all we know of him comes through Holmes' anecdotal description. Holmes is typically sparing with his praise and swift with criticism, but even he is clearly impressed by Moriarty's genius. Ultimately, we never need to meet Moriarty --Holmes' description makes him far more terrifying than any direct appearance could. His is the hand that has directed seemingly the entire criminal world, orchestrating everything from assassins to pickpockets --and by extension, Holmes himself as he investigates the crimes. Moriarty is cultured and educated --like InuYasha's Naraku, but more genteel, and with a worthier foe.

The Jaffa, on Stargate SG-1. While not a single enemy, the Jaffa have a favoured place as an example of how to write an army of highly-skilled troops (with Star Wars' Stormtroopers as an example of how not to do it). Jaffa and Stormtroopers are both supposed to be the elite shock troops of their respective empires, but where the Stormtroopers are remembered as lightweight "generics" who can't shoot straight, the Jaffa are never less than a genuine threat. Simply put, the Jaffa, on occasion, win. Their weapons are far more powerful, their strategies much more advanced, their equipment unmatched by anything on Earth, and their effectiveness unquestioned. When confronted, the SG forces have no choice but to retreat, outsmart them, or die. Any open battle results in massive casualties, and the SGC is perpetually only a step ahead of them. The heroes must plan strategically, careful to pick their battles. The only edge the SGC has is psychological --the Jaffa are rigidly trained, but the Tau-ri can be more creative than the Jaffa are equipped to deal with. And then there're Anubis' Cull warriors, who are downright nightmare-inducing --bulletproof, implacable, adaptable, and relentlessly cunning. Just one super-soldier is too many for the SGC to deal with.

-----
We applied the cortical electrodes but were unable to get a neural reaction from either patient.





Yeah, I'll read that when I have, like, an extra month on my hands....

Dr. Baltar - Battlestar Galactica. Just plain misbehaven any chance he gets. Always with hot naked super babes.....

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Monday, November 20, 2006 1:02 PM

LWAVES


If I can pitch in:

Can I pick George Lucas??

Otherwise:

Caleb, Spike, Angelus and the Mayor from BTVS/Angel.

Definitely Niska from FF.

The Aliens from movies of same name.

Daleks for a classic baddie.

Rutger Hauer in Blade Runner is a cool baddie. Love his 'Tears in the rain' speech.

Human Cylons from new BSG. Really like the whole religious 'One God' line they take.

Pennywhistle. Yes someone else remembers him. Clowns are just darn creepy and should be shot on sight.

Tess from Roswell. I was watching several shows at the time where my favourite characters turned out to be baddies in one form or another and Tess was my fave on this show. When I realised she had killed Alex I couldn't believe it. But her cuteness made me forgive her.

I would have had Vader as well but not since his 'NOOOOO!!!' outburst at the end of Ep3.
The Terminator was good but I like my baddies with personality so he don't make the list either.

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Wednesday, November 22, 2006 8:22 PM

DREAMWALKER


From Firefly: The Operative, the Alliance in general, Niska, and the Reavers

From Buffy/Angel: Spike, Angelus, The First, Caleb, Wolfram and Hart

From Doctor Who: my favorite is the Master, but you've gotta love the Daleks.

From BSG: the Cylons

Stargate/Antlantis: Ba'al is my favorite SG-1 villian, although the Ori definitely make interesting enemies, for Atlantis it's definitely the Wraith.

Star Wars: Not even touching the prequels (unless I can call George Lucas a villian for making them?) From the movies: Darth Vader. From the books: The Yuzum Vong, fanatical creatures with almost unbeatable technology on a holy crusade to conquer the galaxy. Definitely not people I'd like to find out were heading toward my planet.

Wash: This landing is gonna get pretty interesting
Mal: Define "interesting".
Wash: Oh God, of God, we're all going to die?

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Thursday, November 23, 2006 3:49 AM

CYBERSNARK


Quote:

Originally posted by Dreamwalker:
Yuzum Vong,

Nitpick: Yuuzhan Vong.

The Yuzzem are tall furry creatures from Endor, seen in the old Ewoks cartoon. The image of these long-legged puffball creatures trying to take over the galaxy is. . . kinda funny, actually.

-----
We applied the cortical electrodes but were unable to get a neural reaction from either patient.

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Thursday, November 23, 2006 1:19 PM

EVERYTHINGSSHINY2K6


1. Baltar/Number 6 from the new Battlestar Galactica
2. The Hands of Blue (Evil & very creepy)
3. Big Brother (From the George Orwell novel 1984 - read it when I was on holiday over summer amazing book)
4. Spike
5. Angelus

A friend of mine also finds the character of ET very scary for some reason. He first saw it when he was 5 and has only just started to get over it now... he's 20

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Thursday, November 23, 2006 1:51 PM

THESOMNAMBULIST


a - Krank from CITY OF THE LOST CHILDREN
b - The Operative
c - Jubal Early
d - Dfens from FALLING DOWN (I love the idea of the bad guy not realising he is the bad guy)
e - Zark from TRON
f - The Devil from BRIMSTONE
h - Rain from BIG TROUBLE IN LITTLE CHINA
i - Beloq from RAIDERS OF THE LOST ARK




www.cirqus.com

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Thursday, November 23, 2006 1:52 PM

JAMESTHEDARK


My pick for favorite villain is one that I'm fairly sure nobody has ever heard of.

01 Boxer, from Charlie Jade.

That's right, his name is zero-one (pronounced oh-won), and in the beginning, he was protrayed as a heartless, debauched sociopath. In fact, they go to great lengths in the beginning of the series to show that 01 is just friggin' nuts. But then, the character begins to change, and the layers of his madness and depravity are slowly peeled back, until you are left with just the innermost core of his soul, a sad, frightened man, desparate to do what is right, knowing that he's sacrificing his sanity in order to do it. He's the villain who's singular goal was to save the world, if that shows you how well he was put together by the writers. I found myself rooting for him long before the end of the series, where he and the actual protagonist go down, together, in a blaze of glory to prevent the destruction of three universes.
That, and I still remember the catchy little theme that they played every time he strutted onto the screen. Although, the platform hooker-boots have been burned into my memory, too...

--------------
I ain't lookin' for help from on high. That's a damn long wait for a train don't come.

98% of teens have smoked pot, if you are one of the 2% that haven't, copy this into your signature.

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Friday, November 24, 2006 7:13 AM

CYBERSNARK


What about the freaky anime-hair?

And yes, I saw all of Charlie Jade and loved it. Boxer was awesome. There's so little good "conspiracy" fiction on TV (as opposed to "mystery" and "police procedural" fiction, which we're drowning in). Heard rumours that there was to be a second season, but nothing recently.

-----
We applied the cortical electrodes but were unable to get a neural reaction from either patient.

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Saturday, November 25, 2006 7:25 PM

DREAMWALKER


Quote:

Originally posted by Cybersnark:
Quote:

Originally posted by Dreamwalker:
Yuzum Vong,

Nitpick: Yuuzhan Vong.

The Yuzzem are tall furry creatures from Endor, seen in the old Ewoks cartoon. The image of these long-legged puffball creatures trying to take over the galaxy is. . . kinda funny, actually.

-----
We applied the cortical electrodes but were unable to get a neural reaction from either patient.



When fuzzballs attack?

Dreamwalker who once again tells herself posting and spelling at 1 am isn't the best idea in the 'verse

Wash: This landing is gonna get pretty interesting
Mal: Define "interesting".
Wash: Oh God, of God, we're all going to die?

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Saturday, November 25, 2006 9:22 PM

EVAN


1: Benjamin Lynus (AKA Henry Gale) From LOST
2: Sideshow Bob!
3: Jubal Early (from Firefly in case you where wondering)
4: That Giant Cloud thing From The Fifth Element
5: THE SARLAC PIT!!!! OOOMMMGGG scary stuff right there

Are you having a laugh?

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Sunday, November 26, 2006 2:13 PM

JAGUAR


Well, in no particular order: The Reavers, Niska, The Wraith (from Stargate Atlantis), The Gou'ld (from SG1, even though they're almost totally defeated now), The Replicators (also from SG1), Scorpius, I think that's his name... (from Farscape), and The Obin, they don't have souls (from John Scalzi's books, Old Man's War and The Ghost Brigades)

Do not touch anything unnecessarily. Beware of pretty girls in dance halls and parks who may be spies, as well as bicycles, revolvers, uniforms, arms, dead horses, and men lying on roads -- they are not there accidentally.
So the moral is...be paranoid.

Have a great day!

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Sunday, November 26, 2006 3:40 PM

DOROTHEA


My all-time favorite villain is Suitenguu from Speed Grapher (anime).

After him, I can't really say. I did love Spike from Buffy and the "two-by-two, hands-of-blue" guys from Firefly. We never knew much about the blue-handed guys, but they sure were creepy.

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Sunday, November 26, 2006 6:43 PM

SIRI


Here are some of my favorites:

Firefly - Reavers are the scariest and creepiest, The Operative - cause he was a "true believer" almost as scary as a Reaver; Hands of Blue guys - big yuch!

BtVS - Dark Willow, The First, The Master, Glory, Spike and, of course, our captain as Caleb the evil preacher

Angel - Angelus, Jasmine (Gina), The little girl in the white room

Harry Potter - Lord Voldemort and Lucius Malfoy

Dune - Baron Harkonnen; Feyd-Rautha Harkonnen

Siri

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