OTHER SCIENCE FICTION SERIES

Looking for a new book to read

POSTED BY: AMYGDALA
UPDATED: Tuesday, November 29, 2005 18:52
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Thursday, September 15, 2005 2:11 AM

SNIPER


For something Firefly related, kinda, sorta, I'd recommend the Icarus Hunt by Timothy Zahn.

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Thursday, September 15, 2005 8:08 PM

TERRYO


I would try at least one more Honor. They aren't as flashy as some but the thing I liked (and I haven't read them all) is her integrity. Maybe more subtle in some ways and yeah, sometimes boring (I like lots of opera in my space opera) but okay. Guys seem to like them better.

Some more off-the-wall books: Melisa Michaels "Floater" books - dont' remember the proper titles right off hand but interesting use of language. I think she integrated Haiwaiin (sp??) - love it when people integrate unique language patterns.

Melisa also runs Embiid.net which publishes ebooks of the Liaden universe and her own and others...

A series a friend had me read, Debra Doyle and James MacDonald (plus??) was pretty fun. Returned the books to him, though, but you'll probably find them all on half.com.

If you like a very strange premise, odd but almost beautiful prose and again, very interesting use of language there is the Hellflower trilogy by eluki bes shahar who is also Rosemary Edghill - and her sister India is also pretty good, too. She wrote Regencies at one point, which helps decipher the Hellflower stuff if you know a bit about "cant" I think it's called. She has a site on sff.net and I'm pretty sure Baen has some of her newer stuff in their electronic library.

Anything by Peter David works for me, too. The man can write angst (Imzadi) and then turn around and have you ROTFL. (Sir Apropos of Nothing)

I think it's time to hit Amazon again...

Terry

p.s. almost forgot the Artemis Fowl books. technically they're for kids but I suspect more adults read them.

Quote:


- Note that Harrington series is mentioned a lot in this thread. Read the first one and (she cringes in anticipation of horrified replies) not totally convinced. Anyone else feel this way then get converted later on? I'm really not a pure adventure and space-battley reader - need a large proportion of human interest. Maybe I should just give up?




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Thursday, September 15, 2005 8:29 PM

OURMRREYNOLDS


Here's my votes:
Dark tower dark tower dark tower: its sci fi and its fantasy and its western- nuthin' else to say 'cept read Eyes of the Dragon- a related book not in the series

terry pratchett discworld: laugh out loud funny- he's done some kids books in the same world (Amazing Maurice and his Educated Rodents) and The Wee Free Men- appropriate for kids and great for us fogies too

stephen brust: To Reign in Hell and Cowboy Feng's Space Bar and Grill I won't describe 'em 'cause I can't do 'em justice

Harry Harrison: Bill the Galactic Hero and Stainless Steel Rat series- both get kinda odd towards the end, not sure if I mean that in a good way but fun as hell

fantasy hack 'n slash: William King's slayer series set in the world of Warhammer (Trollslayer, Skavenslayer, Beastslayer, etc.) Gotrek is the biggest badass in any genre EVER- a dwarf with a mohawk that doubles his height, eyepatch, facial piercings and a mystical axe. Perfectly willing to assault a siege engine or entire army solo, with a hangover. the books are short fast reads and the action is too intense


Cynicism is the smoke that rises from the ashes of burned out dreams.

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Friday, September 16, 2005 2:46 AM

TERRYO


Harry Harrison wrote one of my all-time favorite time travel books "Rebel in Time" and every time I read it I think, Denzel, Denzel, why haven't you optioned this book? My daughter loves the Stainless Steel Rat series but they never got me. I did like a few of the Galactic Hero books way back when...

I should have seconded the first Diana Gabaldon book as a riveting, don't plan anything for the weekend kind of book. Well, if you like Scottish history, anyway, and one incredible smoking, steam -rising-off-the-pages hero. I didn't like the sequels as much but Jamie and Clair are great characters. (Warning: graphic sex and a rape that makes you want to cry when the victim recounts it.)

I do have a couple of favorite old, apocolyptic-style novels, "Alas Babylon" by Pat Frank (very dated now but so am I - lol - but it totally pegs the sixties nuclear fears) and "Lucifer's Hammer" by Niven and Pournelle (you'll never think of rats in quite the same way).

These days I don't read a lot of scific unless someone recommends a specific book. I read mainly mysteries and fluff like Janet Evanovich - btw, Reese Witherspoon as Stephanie Plum, no way - so I've been collecting recommendations too.

Terry

Quote:

Originally posted by OurMrReynolds:
Here's my votes:
...snip...

Harry Harrison: Bill the Galactic Hero and Stainless Steel Rat series- both get kinda odd towards the end, not sure if I mean that in a good way but fun as hell

...snip...
Cynicism is the smoke that rises from the ashes of burned out dreams.


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Friday, September 16, 2005 4:17 AM

TERRYO


Went to Amazon to look this up and got looking at other TZ books. (I had only read the Star Wars ones.) Anyway I was reading through the reviews of a Dragon/Thief trilogy and thinking that I needed to pick it up until I read the review of the last book. Recommended for reluctant readers, boys 10-15. ;-)

Terry

Quote:

Originally posted by Sniper:
For something Firefly related, kinda, sorta, I'd recommend the Icarus Hunt by Timothy Zahn.


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Wednesday, September 21, 2005 5:51 AM

FNORDCHAN


Quote:

Originally posted by terryo:
A series a friend had me read, Debra Doyle and James MacDonald (plus??) was pretty fun. Returned the books to him, though, but you'll probably find them all on half.com.



That would be the Mageworlds series which is fluffy space opera about the offspring of a scoundrel and a princess, with psychic powers thrown in. It's all very Star Wars (up to and including Wookies), but I mean that in the best possible way, and it's all a helluva lot of fun. If you're a fan of the Vorkosigan and Liaden books and are looking for more in a similar vein, you'll enjoy the Mageworlds series.

There's a fair pile of books in the series, but at it's core Mageworlds is a trilogy: Price of the Stars, Starpilot's Grave, and By Honor Betray'd. Beyond that there's a prequel, a next-generation sequel, and several way-prequel books that I haven't gotten to just yet.

On the Vorkosigan front, as someone who was advocating beginning with the Miles books I should say that beginning with his parent's adventures (as collected in Cordelia's Honor) is just as good if not better. When recommending the series I've found the first couple of Miles books to be a solid hook, at which point folks usually go back and read the first two books - but they're really just as good, if not better, starting point. To be honest, it's really hard to go wrong no matter what - as long as people are picking up and buying the Vorkosigan books, I'm happy.

Also, I was pleased to see that the first collection of the Liaden chapbooks, The Liaden Universe Compainion (Volume One) is now out in trade paperback, collecting all sorts of short stories and novellas that fill in gaps (or just go off on fun tangents) in the Liaden series. These were way too pricey when they were being sold as the chapbooks, but collected this is a helluva deal. Highly recommended!

Finally, my ludicrous to-read backlog has kept me from reading anything recommended in this thread so far, but I have been keeping notes and hope to enjoy some of the recommendations Real Soon Now.

FnordChan


"I do have a cause, though. It's obscenity. I'm for it." - Tom Lehrer

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Wednesday, September 21, 2005 10:08 AM

TERRYO


Thanks for posting the Mageworlds titles. I agree that they were fun. I don't know if I would reread them like I do the Vorkosigan novels but if you need something new it fits the bill.

And thanks for the update on the Liaden chapbooks - I think I have them all but they are scattered in boxes. Digest format tends to slip through the cracks. Book format is good. And lendable. Also need to replace my Plan B, which seems to have disappeared.

Terry


Quote:

Originally posted by FnordChan:

...snipping Mageworlds list but yes, that's the one...

Also, I was pleased to see that the first collection of the Liaden chapbooks, The Liaden Universe Compainion (Volume One) is now out in trade paperback, collecting all sorts of short stories and novellas that fill in gaps (or just go off on fun tangents) in the Liaden series. These were way too pricey when they were being sold as the chapbooks, but collected this is a helluva deal. Highly recommended!

...snipping...

"I do have a cause, though. It's obscenity. I'm for it." - Tom Lehrer


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Monday, September 26, 2005 6:06 PM

AMYGDALA


- So, I've finished the Vorkosigan Series, and wow. Highly recommended. Have achieved my goal in making this thread of finding more books that you don't want to ever end.

For those who have yet to discover this series, the author is Lois McMaster Bujold, the genre is sci-fi, and the series is just so much fun. If you love your heroes smart, sarcastic, fighting stacked odds, and more than a little crazy (and you know you do), start reading.

The stories in order are: Shards of Honour, Barrayar, The Warrior's Apprentice, The Mountains of Mourning, The Vor Game, Cetaganda, Labyrinth, Brothers in Arms, Borders of Infinity, Mirror Game, Memory, Komarr, A Civil Campaign, Winterfair Gifts, Diplomatic Immunity.

Here it gets confusing. Some are stand-alone novels, some come in short story form with other stories from the series, or even with stories from other authors. I highly recommend just downloading them all as ebooks. Between baenbooks, fictionwise and amazon they should all be available. There are also two stories: Ethan of Athos and Falling Free, which aren't nescessary to the series, and don't directly involve Miles.

Do try to read them in order, especially the later ones. After a delay getting the books from Amazon, I gave in and read Komarr before the preceding three books, and I hugely regret it. Two of these books were hugely affecting, and I didn't get the full impact of the story as I knew what the main outcomes would be.

Favorites? Warrior's Apprentice and The Vor Game. Maladaptive alter ego of a troubled young man or no, the early Admiral Naismith bluffing his way around the universe makes for stunning, hilarious reading. Also Mirror Game and Memory were wonderful in a completely different way. Before these novels, I thought Bujold's stories could start getting formulaic and tired, but she goes off on a whedonesque tangent and makes everything new. Magnificent.

- Just wanted to add to the mention of Stephen Donaldson's Gap Series. Started reading it again after I saw it mentioned here (forgot I had it, actually). Space opera on a truly operatic scale. Literally. It's actually based on Wagner's four-part opera cycle The Ring of the Nibelung. It's not my favourite series ever, but is pretty compulsive reading with an truly explosive climax. It's the sort of series where if you imagine the worst thing that could ever happen to a character, it happens and then some. And it never lets up.

- Have also just read the latest book in the Alvin Maker trilogy, The Crystal City. This series is my favourite of Orson Scott Card's. It has a charm and humour that appears to be missing in his other work. It's a fantasy series set in an America that failed to achieve Independence, and where magic exists. In this latest book I finally twigged that Alvin has become a Christ-like figure. Not sure if I want to read the next novel in the series, 'cos that never turns out well.

- Lastly, noticed the widespread approval of The Dark Materials trilogy, and thought I'd suggest a children's trilogy that I thought was even better. Called: The Wind On Fire. Author: William Nicholson. Check it out.

Would love other people's feedback on books featured in this thread.

'Til next time



----
"She was naked, and all ... articulate."

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Wednesday, September 28, 2005 5:30 AM

FANTASTICLAUGHINGFAIRY


Why don't you try Eragon and Eldest, the first two books in the new 'Inheritence' trilogy.
They're amazing, I've not enjoyed books this much since I read the His Dark Materials trilogy.
Cracking.

...and we will call it...this land...

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Wednesday, September 28, 2005 9:01 PM

FLAMELILY


Anything by Terry Pratchett - this man is a genius.
If you love the slightly twisted viewpoint of the world, and his ability to turn common situations on their head and show us just how daft and shallow we really all are!
They are definately the thinking persons comedy. You can read them superficially and roll on the floor laughing, or read them again and get the hidden message.
WARNING: he has written thirty-odd discworld novels, so once you're hooked, be prepared to buy them all!
Check out http://www.ie.lspace.org/
They have a suggested reading list etc -my advice is read them in the order they were written, then they all flow.
I love writing, but this man makes me wonder why I try! in one line he can create a city for you to explore.... he is amazing. And did I mention FUNNY!

Quote:
- "If you're going to suggest I try dropping twenty feet down a pitch dark
tower in the hope of hitting a couple of greasy little steps which might
not even still be there, you can forget it," said Rincewind sharply.
- "There is an alternative, then."
- "Out with it, man."
- "You could drop five hundred feet down a pitch black tower and hit stones
which certainly are there," said Twoflower.
Dead silence from below him. Then Rincewind said, accusingly, "That was sarcasm."

-- (Terry Pratchett, The Light Fantastic)

another one:

Only one creature could have duplicated the expressions on their faces, and that would be a pigeon who has heard not only that Lord Nelson has got down off his column but has also been seen buying a 12-bore repeater and a box of cartridges.

-- (Terry Pratchett, Mort)

and another one:

It is a fact that although the Death of the Discworld is, in his own words, an ANTHROPOMORPHIC PERSONIFICATION, he long ago gave up using the traditional skeletal horses, because of the bother of having to stop all the time to wire bits back on.

-- (Terry Pratchett, Mort)

OH GOD STOP ME!!!! I can quote TP until the end of time......

Must stop, must stop....




They say they want a soulmate and a helpmeet, but sooner or later the list includes skin like silk and a chest fit for a herd of cows....Angua in 'Jingo' by Terry Pratchett

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Monday, October 31, 2005 8:47 PM

AMYGDALA


Just an update on how the reading goes:

* Just caught up with the latest book in the Song of Ice and Fire trilogy (see multiple mentions above): 'A Feast for Crows'. In Martin's own words "This one was a bitch". Well, it's no picnic for readers either. Don't get me wrong - I love this guy, I adore the series. What aSoIaF might lack in the deep and meaningful, it makes up for in an intricate, enthralling plot of betrayal and counter-betrayal, some kick-ass characters, a nice sense of history and some nifty foreshadowing in place from the very first page.

But the series does seem to be slipping out of control. What I believe was originally meant to be four volumes is now likely to become seven (this latest was number four). We've waited almost five years between this book and its predescessor for (wait for it): just half the planned novel. AFfC was to be part of the next book "A Dance With Dragons" until the length became unmanageable. The choice was made to split aDwD into two separate novels, with each book only following characters in certain geographical areas, presumably over the same time period. For good reasons, I'm sure.

So what was wrong? Mostly, it just didn't feel like a whole book. Sure, it's not really meant to be, but that means it lacked that nice sense of semi-completion the others gave as they ended, allowing the wait for the next book to be that much more bearable. Causes probably included the the omitted characters (arguably some of the most interesting), as well as the paucity of significant events that resulted from only a few stories being told. Another big problem for me was the fact that at the end of the book, several characters were left in fairly dire situations, and I find the thought that these might only be resolved two books later fairly infuriating.

I think my negative reaction is due in part to the previous novel "A Storm of Swords", which was just brilliant. My expectations were high, and you can't get it so right all the time. I do have to say though, that this latest novel also *felt* wrong in places, the writing seemed to lack the subtlety of previous volumes. But I guess there is the possibility that this is an intentional phenomenon - as the story progresses, secrets are revealed.

My worry is, of course, that we have another Jordanesque scenario on our hands - a promising series that which the writing deteriorates as the number of volumes mounts. But I still have faith. Martin's still the guy. It may just take a couple of re-reads before I've made my peace with the novel. It's happened before. And he says the next one should be out next year....

* Speaking of Jordan. New book out now. Read on the cover it's the penultimate volume. What is it - eleven? twelve? Anyway, made the decision to wait 'til the final book is in paperback, then *perhaps* on a rainy day, buy the final two and read them, just to finish the damn thing. No. Screw it, I'll get them from the library. Thinking about the money I've spent to watch a great series become progressively rubbish makes me tetchy.

* Latest Pratchett all good. Yeah, didn't mention him in the first post 'cos strangely I don't file him under sci-fi/fantasy in my head (I have a strange head). I think he's under "too damn funny" or suchlike. What I love best about Pratchett is his ferocity when it comes to injustice. His novels aren't throwaway funnies, they get deeper with each read. Thanks Flamelily for the quotes - made me all giggly.

So folks, what have you been reading?

----
"She was naked, and all ... articulate."

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Tuesday, November 1, 2005 1:24 AM

LIMINALOSITY


Thanks for some great suggestions! I was hoping someone would dredge up this thread, I knew something like it would be in the archives somewhere.

Amygdala, you named some of my favorite authors (Ursula, Dick, Tepper, Grr Martin, OS Card).

There were three authors I think you might enjoy but didn't see mentioned in the suggestions:

Samuel R Delaney - I especially like his "Stars in my Pocket Like Grains of Sand"
Open it to a random page sometime in the store and see if you like his voice, since you like Ursula. Stars reminds me of her work. Not so much Earthsea (though I love that stuff), but some of her more sociological rantings.

"The Gormenghast Trilogy" by Mervyn S Peake
Fans of Gaiman and Mieville might enjoy this very much. I second those choices!

Nobody mentioned Douglas Adams? I enjoyed Long Dark Teatime of the Soul and Dirk Gently every bit as much as Hitchhiker.

I'd also strongly second Gibson. Everything by Gibson. I read today Peter Weir is working on filming his latest "Pattern Recognition", and I have my fingers crossed.

...and Stevenson, and Banks.

I'll be putting



Shiny Trees! Yavanna made Shiny Trees!

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Tuesday, November 1, 2005 2:29 PM

CAIUS


Quote:

Originally posted by RelFexive:
Altered Carbon, Broken Angels and Woken Furies by Richard Morgan.

Cryptonomican by Neal Stephenson. Also, Quicksilver, The Confusion and The System Of The World by same.

Anything by Iain M Banks.

Anything by Peter F Hamilton.

"My God - you're like a trained ape. Without the training."



If you like Banks then anything by Ken Macleod. Also I just read Iron Sunrise by Charles Stross, which was nominated for the Hugo.

-Caius

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Thursday, November 3, 2005 9:10 AM

EMBERS


I wanted to add one more to the list,
(I've scanned down, I don't think anyone mentioned):
David Brin's Kiln People
it is a very unusual and really brilliant genre mix of sci-fi and detective mystery

**********************************************
watch the R. Tam Session vids: http://www.hittarivertam.nu/
and buy the 'Serenity' comics published by Dark Horse,
and have you joined the Browncoats yet?
http://browncoats.serenitymovie.com/serenity/?fuseaction=tools.invlink
&u=embers&linkID=36

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Thursday, November 3, 2005 9:29 AM

SPINLAND


Eager second to Roger Zelazny et al. though with a special fondness for his Amber stuff (arguably also his best-known works, so easy to find). Some of his other work can get pretty "navel-gazing," but the prose makes it worth the walk IMNSDHO. His short stories are especially tight.

Someone mentioned C. J. Cherryh, but without the context of my personal favorites among her work. Definitely try Downbelow Station and, if that style appeals, there's The Pride of Chanur and its four sequels (not directly connected to Downbelow Station to be sure, but similar in style despite the alien viewpoint). Then try the Cyteen stuff to round out her stable of greatness.

My current guilty pleasure is the collection of Black Company books by Glen Cook, of which there are now ten (IIRC). This stuff'll never be "High Literature" but I'm on number nine now and it's still been a good read (as opposed to the dreadful drudgery that the top-heavy Wheel of Time saga became several volumes back).

For quirky fantasy tales, there's the Fionavar Tapestry trilogy by Guy Gavriel Kay (friend and contemporary of Chris Tolkien) and, with a motion picture coming out soon, you might give a dusty old classic a try: The Chronicles of Narnia by C. S. Lewis, of which there are seven slim volumes.

Happy reading!

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
"That's what governments are for, [to] get in a man's way." -- Malcolm Reynolds

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Thursday, November 3, 2005 6:06 PM

LIMINALOSITY


Quote:

Originally posted by Spinland:
Eager second to Roger Zelazny Amber stuff

C. J. Cherryh

For quirky fantasy tales, there's the Fionavar Tapestry trilogy by Guy Gavriel Kay



Zelazny's Amber is very fun, and you can practice the alteration technique at home for your own amusement and bendiness.

Cherryh, mmmm. I like her Gates series and Fortress series and Sun series as well as the big cats and other things. One of the remarkable things about her is that she has a map of her universe, and everything she writes relates to the map and its history.

Kay! I totally forgot him and he's wonderful.

Good add's

Shiny Trees! Yavanna made Shiny Trees!

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Friday, November 11, 2005 9:56 AM

THANATUS


My 2 bits -

Anything by Tim Powers...period. Especially Anubis Gates. Agreed that Orson Scott Card is a winner. Also Ivory by Mike Resnick. By the way, if you have any kind of inkling to read an apocalyptic tale, I recommend Father Elijah: An Apocalypse by Michael D. O'Brien. Very well written...everything that the Tribulation Force books could have been, had they not been filled with the pedestrian musings of Jenkins and LeHaye. On the outside chance that you haven't read Heinlein's Starship Troopers, it's a must (the movie does NOT count!) Just a thought...

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Friday, November 11, 2005 11:21 AM

FLECHETTE


Another series/author to check out is Anne Bishop's The Realms of the Blood/Black Jewel series.

Daughter of the Blood, Heir to the Shadows, Queen of the Darkness; are the titles of the trilogy. Available as seperate novels and single compilation

The Invisible Ring is a stand alone novel and I suggest reading after the series- it centers around an event mentioned in Queen of the Darkness.

Fairly recently released is Dreams made Flesh 4 short stories that fill in some details and plotholes from the trilogy.


I didn't care as much for her World of Fae trilogy

________________________________________________
Flechette - Destiny's Cook

We got Crab and pig tell :Squid ink and fish scale
Okra and dasheen leaves
Chitchat and chatter :Fill up the platter
With a garnish of pure make believe
- Jimmy Buffett's Calaloo

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Saturday, November 12, 2005 4:36 AM

PHI


I can't believe that somebody has actually mentioned Kushiel's Legacy already! I have never before seen it mentioned in recommendation lists as it deserves to be. It is fantastic as long as you're reading it for the story and not because it's about a Courtesan. Truly, I won my friend over with this series and she was speechless by the time she'd finished reading. Author: Jacqueline Carey. Read it.

The same friend has told me to read Anne Bishop's Daughter of the blood but I haven't been able to get it through the library yet. I will make more of an effort now that I have seen another recommendation.

Also, The Farseer Trilogy and The Tawny Man Trilogyby Robin Hobb. It took me quite a while to get into these books but I persevered and I am SO glad that I did.

Finally, The Bitterbynde Trilogy by Cecilia Dart Thornton if only for the use of folklore and mythology in it. However, if romance isn't your thing this won't do. The descriptive nature of the writing is stunning although sometimes a bit too flowery. Still worth a look.

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Saturday, November 12, 2005 7:25 AM

FANTASTICLAUGHINGFAIRY


OK - so I'm a teenager, so this'll probably be from a teenager's point of view, but personally I loved:
the Abhorsen Trilogy by Garth Nix

His Dark Materials by Phillip Pullman

Eragon and Eldest by Christopher Paolini

The Named, The Dark and The Key(The Guardians of Time Trilogy) by Marianne Curley are also great reads.

Also The Pact and My Sister's Keeper by Jodi Picoult (these one's aren't exactly sci-fi or fantasy in any sense of the word, but are good books nonetheless)

I'd go for any of these!

...and we will call it...this land...

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Monday, November 14, 2005 3:44 PM

QUEENOFTHENORTH


Two good series not mentioned here:

Nancy Springer's Books of Isle: there's five of these and they're fantastic. However, they were published a long time ago and I don't know if you can get them anymore. I got them at a used bookstore.

Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman's Death Gate Cycle: There's seven of these and they're incredibly compelling. Very good work.

Also, if you wanna read something brand spanking new, check out my "Getting Book Published" thread for info on the book I just got published.

I give to you the Seeker of Serenity, the Valkyrie Warrior, the Gourmet Cook and the Truth Scoper.

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Monday, November 28, 2005 12:04 PM

BROWNCOATINSINGAPORE


Quote:

Originally posted by amygdala:
Just an update on how the reading goes:

* Just caught up with the latest book in the Song of Ice and Fire trilogy (see multiple mentions above): 'A Feast for Crows'. In Martin's own words "This one was a bitch". Well, it's no picnic for readers either. Don't get me wrong - I love this guy, I adore the series. What aSoIaF might lack in the deep and meaningful, it makes up for in an intricate, enthralling plot of betrayal and counter-betrayal, some kick-ass characters, a nice sense of history and some nifty foreshadowing in place from the very first page.

But the series does seem to be slipping out of control. What I believe was originally meant to be four volumes is now likely to become seven (this latest was number four). We've waited almost five years between this book and its predescessor for (wait for it): just half the planned novel. AFfC was to be part of the next book "A Dance With Dragons" until the length became unmanageable. The choice was made to split aDwD into two separate novels, with each book only following characters in certain geographical areas, presumably over the same time period. For good reasons, I'm sure.

So what was wrong? Mostly, it just didn't feel like a whole book. Sure, it's not really meant to be, but that means it lacked that nice sense of semi-completion the others gave as they ended, allowing the wait for the next book to be that much more bearable. Causes probably included the the omitted characters (arguably some of the most interesting), as well as the paucity of significant events that resulted from only a few stories being told. Another big problem for me was the fact that at the end of the book, several characters were left in fairly dire situations, and I find the thought that these might only be resolved two books later fairly infuriating.

I think my negative reaction is due in part to the previous novel "A Storm of Swords", which was just brilliant. My expectations were high, and you can't get it so right all the time. I do have to say though, that this latest novel also *felt* wrong in places, the writing seemed to lack the subtlety of previous volumes. But I guess there is the possibility that this is an intentional phenomenon - as the story progresses, secrets are revealed.



I kinda had mostly the same response to AFFC becoz where's Jon, Bran, Stannis and Beric while knowing at the same time in the back of my head they'll be in the next book. However, that was nothing compared t o the fact we'll have to wait two more books before the story continues from AFFC.

Still, ihave beilief that Martin will wrap up the series in 6/7 books strongly just base on books 1-3 (i really think everyone should dowhat Martin suggested on his site, which is to get Crows and Dragons (the next, as yet unfinished book yet overlapping Crows) when it comes out and exacto the pages and put chapters in the order we like (put Bran after Cersei, then Jon, you get what i mean).

I've just finished reading the Merchant Princes, bk 1 & 2 by Charles Stross ( The Family Trade and The Hidden Family), and i highly recommend it for its take on contemporary urban/modern alternate world fantasy. Its got computers, airships (bk 2), world hopping and explosions. Well, plot and storywise, it starts out strongly, has a strong lead and secondary characters but meanders for the last last half of Bk 1 and most of Bk 2. I'm eagerly awaiting the continuatio/conclusion (not sure if its a trilogy/open ended series).



Stay crunchy. even in milk.

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Monday, November 28, 2005 1:11 PM

SHINYOBJECT


Someone mentioned it allready but I thought I would second "American Gods" by Neil Gaiman a truly amazing book that has become a favorite of mine.

a sequal also recently came out entitled "Aninsi Boys" also a joy to read

not exactly fantasy or sci-fi but at the moment I'm reading "the snow fox" by a women name susan Schaffer, I'll pretty much eat up an medievel asian period novel

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Tuesday, November 29, 2005 3:18 PM

PATSRULE


I love all the Dan Brown books.

On the recomendation of others here, I ordered the first George R.R. Martin Book.

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Tuesday, November 29, 2005 3:33 PM

FOREVERSHINY


Oh, Dan Brown, definatly!

Don't know if it's been mention, but Simon R. Green has a series. Called "The Nightside Series," I think. Some sci-fi--though, sadly, not much--and some really odd fantasy bits.

It's my 2 cents worth, though I have more than 2 cents....Not with me! But in my dresser drawer, where you'll never be able to find it. So there....

Wow..I'm really tired.

Cheers,

~ForeverShiny~
~~~~~~~~~~~
Can't stop the signal!
"No, Cap'n, I think it's shiny!"--Kaylee, o'course.
"Yeah, but she's our witch, so cut her the hell down." --Mal in "Safe."


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Tuesday, November 29, 2005 5:48 PM

RICKKER


well I've come to love anything done by Michael Stackpole and R.A. Salvatore. Mostly fantacy but Stackpole wrote a lot in both the Battletech and Star Wars universe. Also Highly recomend Webers' Honor Harington series. Just finished the newest book. I loved it from the getgo, there is more character development as time goes on.

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Tuesday, November 29, 2005 6:21 PM

CHESHIRE


David Webber, the Honor Harrington series
Rober Jordan, the Wheel of Time series
Terry Pratchett, the Discworld series

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Tuesday, November 29, 2005 6:52 PM

LVS2READ


Just did a quick browse of everyone's recommendations, and I only have one question. Doesn't anybody else here read Anne McCaffrey? Her Dragonrider series is my favorite, but she also writes some other fascinating stuff involving telepathy and telekenisis (The Damia series). And, IMHO, her "Ship Who ..." series is a thought provoking look at how people with physical impairments might live in the far off future. Her "Dinosaur Planet" series deals with cryogenics. If you like Elizabeth Moon, you should probably read this series since she co-authored two of the later ones.

I also second the recommendations for the Honor Harrington series. I read the first two or three, and really enjoyed them. Ended up getting side-tracked (so many books, so little time), but plan to go back to them someday.

Diana Gabaldon is definitely more historical romance than scifi/fantasy, but enjoyable nonetheless. Especially if you like Scottish history.

That's my 2 cents worth. You can take it or leave it, as you please.

"I love my captain."

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