CINEMA

Hunger Games

POSTED BY: SHINYGOODGUY
UPDATED: Saturday, April 14, 2012 16:38
SHORT URL: http://bit.ly/GKZg5K
VIEWED: 2609
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Friday, March 23, 2012 2:41 PM

SHINYGOODGUY


I'm in the process of reading the book and tomorrow, around 4 pm, I will be experiencing the movie. So far I've just skimmed the surface of the 1st book, and it's a fast read; interesting premise and story.

It could easily be considered sci-fi, since it deals with a possible future - and the fact that it's the former United States is the most interesting aspect of all. What's scary is that the signs of the beginnings of that society are present. The jury's still out on that count. I'll know more once I finish the books.

I'll report back tomorrow once I've seen the film.


SGG

Tawabawho?

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Friday, March 23, 2012 6:41 PM

ECGORDON

There's no place I can be since I found Serenity.


I read the book and reviewed it a week or so ago. Saw the movie this afternoon and just uploaded my review of it too.

There are a few spoilers, especially in the movie review, so don't click until later if you're averse to such.

http://templetongate.net/hungergames-book.htm

http://templetongate.net/hungergames-movie.htm



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Friday, March 23, 2012 10:12 PM

PHOENIXROSE

You think you know--what's to come, what you are. You haven't even begun.


Quote:

Originally posted by ecgordon:
I read the book and reviewed it a week or so ago. Saw the movie this afternoon and just uploaded my review of it too.

There are a few spoilers, especially in the movie review, so don't click until later if you're averse to such.

http://templetongate.net/hungergames-book.htm

http://templetongate.net/hungergames-movie.htm


Very interesting that you would say the strength of the books is being told first-person from the perspective of Katniss and how that made you care more. I've actually thought since I read them that the perspective was a bad call because Katniss had the emotional depth of a coconut, and I really didn't care about her at all and thought other characters were far more interesting and better developed, despite the fact that first-person narration should have made her the most developed character in the story. I was kind of figuring that the movie would be better in this way, because the story (which is very exciting) could just play out without all of that emotional deadness in the way. I guess I'll have to see for myself whenever I get around to going.


What reason had proved best ceased to look absurd to the eye, which shows how idle it is to think anything ridiculous except what is wrong.

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Saturday, March 24, 2012 1:29 AM

FREMDFIRMA



Both a weakness and a strength but I think it could have been done better, yeah.

Katniss is very, very messed up - to the point where underneath the facade she's essentialy gone semi-feral, I can relate... and I dunno how you'd write that effectively from anything BUT a first person perspective.
BUT, someone without a frame of reference is gonna find it jarring, maybe a bit boring, and not feel a whole lot of empathy for the character, cause she really, really ISN'T very likeable, as a character or as a person - why Peeta puts up with her...
*shrug*

Gonna be tricky to carry that from an external movie perspective, we will see.

I'm more interested in how well they do Haymitch and Cinna, the latter being my favorite character and having a lot in common attitude-wise with the former.

Honestly, I doubt the movie is gonna pull it off, barring a miracle of acting and directing, and hollywood has given me no faith to go on in that respect.

-Frem

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Saturday, March 24, 2012 3:06 AM

ANONYMOUSE


I received this today from Amazon; I'll start reading it later. But a casual glance at the first page shows a pet peeve of mine: usually I hate novels written in the present tense. It's a literary device to make the reader feel the events are happening right now, but it doesn't work - well, not for me, anyway.

Here's hoping the story's good enough for me not to care overly much.

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Saturday, March 24, 2012 3:50 AM

ECGORDON

There's no place I can be since I found Serenity.


I generally like well-written first person narration, but I realize it is the hardest to master, and Collins didn't do a very good job of it. Most first person stories are told either in past tense (written after the fact), or as in a journal written at the time the events are happening. Katniss could not have been writing a journal, and the present tense was a hindrance to my enjoyment of the book. The premise was interesting, but it lacked depth in both character and history of the times. I still think the book is better, but just barely.

I thought the cast and production personnel had the potential for the movie to be better, but they dropped the ball. Harrelson should have been the perfect Haymitch, but his performance was lackluster. Kravitz is pretty good as Cinna, but he didn't have many scenes, but that should change with the next movie. The major fault with the movie is the script and direction. It was just barely sufficient to tell the story, and none of the characters were explored in any depth.



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Saturday, March 24, 2012 6:27 PM

HKCAVALIER


That went well! Just got back from seeing this, was very pleased. Was mostly in or near tears for the first half of the movie, and much of the time after. All sorts of Nazi Germany, Warsaw Ghetto, Stalinist Russia cues in the scene design. They really go for the emotional jugular with Prim and Mom. Poor Gale, though, kinda ended up this unintended joke because once Kat and Peeta hit the Capitol he's out of the picture but for the innevitable cut aways when K & P kiss or say nice things to each other or save each other's lives--cut to Gale looking mopey. Sorry, dude!

But, to my mind, a solid adaptation of the book, absolutely. Yes, you lose a ton of Katniss' trademark cray-zay, but you also lose pretty much all of the obligatory YA love triangle foolishness. Yes, Gale clearly saw himself in the boy friend zone, but oh well, sucks to be him then.

And I liked the way they openned up the script to include all the business with Seneca, Pres. Snow and the audience reactions. Thought the last scene w/ Seneca was genius and so...well, no spoilers!

And yeah, Frem, I found each book to be more and more psychologically sophisticated as they went along, but the subject of real children placed in these situations, the terrible toll PTSD takes on the psyche seemed to leave a lot of readers scratching their heads.

What happens to Peeta in the third book is both phenomenal as a subject for YA fiction and deeply dispiriting as it utterly eclipses the reader's escapist expectations. I think it's possible to enjoy the first book without a lick of psycho-political engagement, but that last book is just a confusing downer if you're not interested in just how devastating war is to the young.

I think I will eternally be fascinated by the animus garnered by the first person present tense. I wonder--and forgive me, all, if this is too RWED for the movie forum--but I wonder if the first person present bothers materialistic minded folk more than spiritually inclined individuals. Just thinking out loud here. First person present tense is, from a strictly literal perspective unrealistic. There is no real world equivalent. If you can't simply accept the convention on its own terms, you're forced to wonder "how is Katniss writing all this down?" Well, of course, she's not. This creates a dissonance that annoys some folk no end.

It's funny. The book I'm working on takes place 100 years in the future and is written in the 1st-person present. At that point in history though, it's *just* possible that such a thing could exist technologically. Sorta like a thought-activated twitter feed. But I digress...

Of course, this POV never bothers me in the slightest (sure, I've dipped into some pretty atrocious YA written in this POV, but that was, surely, the least of their problems). Of course, I have a pretty robust inner monologue going much of the time. And I love live theatre so the idea of a character "breaking the fourth wall" and saying things that they would never say nor have the occasion to say directly to the audience never phases me. It's theatre, it's art, it's something unique, stop always having to explain everything, not everything can be explained!!!

The idea of being so merged with the character as to experience a spontanious narrative emerging directly from her experience intrigues rather than confuses me.

Anyways, excellent way to spend 2 1/2 hours of my life, definitely. Well cast, well staged, well written. If you wanna hear a nit pick: they kinda rushed the climactic ending of the movie. Kinda rushed through the last few beats before that and suddenly, you're like, is that it? Then they picked up the ball again, quite nicely after that and set up the sequel very tastefully without giving away anything. Well done!

HKCavalier

Hey, hey, hey, don't be mean. We don't have to be mean, because, remember, no matter where you go, there you are.

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Saturday, March 24, 2012 8:19 PM

PHOENIXROSE

You think you know--what's to come, what you are. You haven't even begun.


Quote:

Originally posted by HKCavalier:
What happens to Peeta in the third book is both phenomenal as a subject for YA fiction and deeply dispiriting as it utterly eclipses the reader's escapist expectations. I think it's possible to enjoy the first book without a lick of psycho-political engagement, but that last book is just a confusing downer if you're not interested in just how devastating war is to the young.

I think I will eternally be fascinated by the animus garnered by the first person present tense. I wonder--and forgive me, all, if this is too RWED for the movie forum--but I wonder if the first person present bothers materialistic minded folk more than spiritually inclined individuals. Just thinking out loud here. First person present tense is, from a strictly literal perspective unrealistic. There is no real world equivalent. If you can't simply accept the convention on its own terms, you're forced to wonder "how is Katniss writing all this down?" Well, of course, she's not. This creates a dissonance that annoys some folk no end.


Just speaking for myself here, but Peeta's whole arc was the most interesting thing in the novels, to me, and part of the reason it was... frustrating to have it told from the perspective of this girl who didn't really seem to care, even when she kept saying that she did care. Maybe that was the intent, but I still thought it was perhaps the wrong choice of perspective for that author writing that character. Peeta was more interesting and more developed and more sympathetic than the perspective character. I mean... c'mon, really?
I think there were more effective ways to explore the characters and conflict, just in general. The novels did a lot of telling where they should have been showing, and a lot of showing where there could have been some great internal monologue exploring what was happening on an emotional level. That's the thing about first-person, is that it can offer a perspective that is rarely seen, a look at the internal workings of someone's heart. Sure, no one really thinks through what they're feeling in detail, but the written word can describe it in detail anyway. I think that's what I felt as lacking. And Peeta's story made me wish it was being told in third person, just so I could see more of it.
(And I don't have any problem with first-person perspective in general. My favorite current series is the Dresden Files.)


What reason had proved best ceased to look absurd to the eye, which shows how idle it is to think anything ridiculous except what is wrong.

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Sunday, March 25, 2012 3:15 AM

WHOZIT


Deadline.com is reporting that the film will gross over $150 million over the weekend, I'm not sure if it will beat "Avatar" but will likely piss off hard core "Twilight" fans.

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Sunday, March 25, 2012 5:28 AM

TWO

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly


How can Panem be so poor and yet so rich in knowledge? Could any real country have an economy like Panem’s? Actually, yes. - www.slate.com/articles/technology/technology/2012/03/the_hunger_games_
could_a_real_country_have_an_economy_like_panem_s_.single.html

“Africa’s modern states, they note, were created by European colonialists who set out to create extractive institutions to exploit the local population. The injustice of the situation led eventually to African mass resistance and the overthrow of colonial rule. But in almost every case, the new elite simply started running the same extractive institutions for their own benefit. The real battle turned out to have been over who ran the machinery of extraction, not its existence. And this, precisely, is the moral of Collins’ trilogy.”

The Joss Whedon script for "Serenity," where Wash lives, is
Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/two

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Sunday, March 25, 2012 8:08 AM

FREMDFIRMA


Quote:

Originally posted by two:
But in almost every case, the new elite simply started running the same extractive institutions for their own benefit. The real battle turned out to have been over who ran the machinery of extraction, not its existence.


This being, essentially, what politics is about - everyone fighting over who gets to hold that leash, and not a one of em willing to cut it.
That is why I am an Anarchist.

Only character even close to that in the story is Johanna Mason, and boy does it cost her, plus, she's not very nice, one might notice.

-F

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Monday, March 26, 2012 4:19 PM

RIONAEIRE

Beir bua agus beannacht


I really like first person present tense HK, it feels like I'm experiencing things along with the narrator. A lot of the stories I write on fictionpress are in first person present, not as a forray into the metaphysical, but as a vehicle for getting the reader to be in the moment with the charactors. I've read some amazing first person present novels, notably Shabanu and the Bloody Jack novels, lots of fun those.

My dad saw it without me because I was at the zoo that day. I'll see it when it comes out on video I think. I've also decided to give in and read the books, but it will be a long time before I get to them because my booklist is soooooo long.

I assume you're my pal until you let me know otherwise

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Tuesday, March 27, 2012 3:06 AM

ANONYMOUSE


Well, I've read The Hunger Games - and I'm in two minds. I still don't like present tense narrative, but the premise was sufficiently intriguing that I'm going to buy the other two books. I'm curious to see what the powers that be have in mind for Katniss after her rebellion, though I imagine they'll 'invite' her back to the Games and then stack the odds against her.

As if they're not high enough already.

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Tuesday, March 27, 2012 6:45 AM

PHOENIXROSE

You think you know--what's to come, what you are. You haven't even begun.


Quote:

Originally posted by Anonymouse:
I'm curious to see what the powers that be have in mind for Katniss after her rebellion, though I imagine they'll 'invite' her back to the Games and then stack the odds against her.


Well, good thing the story isn't too predictable or anything...


What reason had proved best ceased to look absurd to the eye, which shows how idle it is to think anything ridiculous except what is wrong.

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Tuesday, March 27, 2012 8:39 AM

TWO

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly


Quote:

Originally posted by PhoenixRose:
Well, good thing the story isn't too predictable or anything...

If Panem can slaughter children on TV, then Reaver levels of crazy become reasonable and acceptable military strategy. Allegorically, Panem is the US, which firebombed and twice nuked children, so it's quite predictable when Gale says in Catching Fire,

Select to view spoiler:


“Katniss, there is no District Twelve.”

It is inevitable for the story to go there.

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Wednesday, March 28, 2012 2:29 AM

ZZETTA13


Saw the movie yesterday knowing nothing about the books or anything, went in totally blind. Don’t know if it’s by word of mouth, an active advertisement campaign or whatever, but there was a very good crowd for a Tuesday noontime showing.

Like HKC said, I was very pleased. To sum up, it gave me the feeling of a gladiator arena, The Running Man, a bit of a darker twisted Wizard of Oz & Twilight saga all rolled into one.

Enjoyable.

Z

“The only one who can kill Barnes is Barnes!”

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Wednesday, March 28, 2012 4:10 AM

ZEEK


If anybody wants a cheap deal on the books in e-book form there's a deal here: http://slickdeals.net/f/4106127-Hunger-Games-Trilogy-ebook-for-4-05-fr
om-Kobo-Store
?

Should work out to:
Hunger Games (1st book) $0.83
Catching Fire (2nd book) $1.16
Mockingjay (3rd book) $1.07

I haven't personally read any of them. So, no idea if they're worth the time or not. Just thought I'd pass on the deal.

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Wednesday, March 28, 2012 5:48 PM

RIONAEIRE

Beir bua agus beannacht


Sometimes the narrator isn't the main charactor and so they aren't developed all that much. Hastings narrates Poirot novels, Watson narrates Study in Scarlet, sometimes the narrator is a vehicle or mirror for getting us to understand the main charactor, who isn't narrating, the narrator is there to reflect the main charactor back to us. I haven't read Hunger Games yet, maybe that's what the author is trying to do?

I assume you're my pal until you let me know otherwise. "A completely coherant River means writers don't deliver" KatTaya

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Thursday, March 29, 2012 2:46 AM

TWO

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly


Quote:

Originally posted by RionaEire:
. . . sometimes the narrator is a vehicle or mirror for getting us to understand the main character, who isn't narrating, the narrator is there to reflect the main character back to us. I haven't read Hunger Games yet, maybe that's what the author is trying to do?

Suzanne Collins was doing nothing so sophisticated as that.

J. K. Rowling has no competition from Collins in literary artistry. Not only written from the viewpoint of a 16 year old girl, there are pages that seem to be written by a 16 year old. Maybethat is the artistry.

You are only two minutes away from discovering that for yourself about Suzanne Collins' Hunger Games trilogy.
At least you are if you know what "bittorrent" means. http://bit.ly/H2X4pa

The Game books come in 3 formats: .epub .mobi .pdf
There is a nice epub reader for Firefox www.epubread.com/
mobi can be read on a Kindle, PC, phone, pda www.mobipocket.com/en/DownloadSoft/default.asp
The pdf version is double ugly.

The Joss Whedon script for "Serenity," where Wash lives, is
Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/two

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Saturday, April 7, 2012 1:56 AM

ANONYMOUSE


Well, I've now seen the film, and I was pleasantly surprised. It's pretty close to the book, and I think it'll be one for the DVD collection.

Neat use of exposition, i.e. the opening talk show, to replace the first-person narrative; I was half expecting - and wouldn't have minded - a voiceover from Katniss.

Katniss shooting the apple was played perfectly, and as a former archer myself I can definitely say that was an entirely feasible shot. An apple is only a little smaller than the innermost scoring ring of a standard outdoor archery target, and Katniss was, what, 20 yards away, if that? To explain:

Such targets, which are 128cm in diameter, have 5 colours, each with an inner and outer ring - outer white scores 1 point, inner white scores 2, and so on (black = 3 or 4, blue = 5 or 6, red = 7 or 8, yellow = 9 or 10). Each colour ring is 12 cm wide. In the UK, if you're getting an average of 6 arrows all in the blue at 100 yards, i.e. every arrow scores 5 or better, you're shooting to First Class standard (roughly the top quarter of UK archers). If you're getting them inside the red at 100 yards, you're Bowman Class (roughly the top 10%) - I reached that standard, for a month or so, back in 1996. Unfortunately it went to my head, and I fell apart; it wasn't as though I hadn't been working for it, but it happened so suddenly. I never shot that consistently again, I'm afraid. Then I had an accident in 2000 (March 28th, and trust me, peeps, if you check you will find it was a Tuesday. It was the worst night of my life, and nearly my last - all that saved me was a £10 cycle helmet) that did my shoulder in, and I never recovered my skill. :(

So an apple's only a bit smaller than the 10 ring (12cm diameter), and she was a lot closer than 100 yards. At my best, I could've made that shot. Not that I would, as it would breach UK safety rules if anyone were on the wrong side of the shooting line, i.e. in front of the archer. :) There was a time when you legally could shoot anyone who was daft enough to wander onto an archery range, on the logical grounds that anyone that daft deserved whatever they got, but [sarcasm] we're more "civilised" now, aren't we? [/sarcasm]

A few minor gripes re the film:

Jennifer looks a little too old and tall to play Katniss, who's 16, but she played the role very well regardless. Casting as a whole was spot-on, though, especially Peeta, Cinna and Prim, who looked just lovely and angelic in that white dress at the Reaping.

The riot in District 11 was a) in the wrong film (it doesn't take place until Catching Fire), and b) in the wrong place - it should've been District 8. On the other hand, the reason for it - Rue's televised death and Katniss singing to her as she slipped away - was so well played.

Buttercup, Prim's cat, was the wrong colour, and wasn't as ugly as he should've been. :)

Finally, I was rather looking forward to seeing a mockingjay, and an explanation of what they were wouldn't have come amiss. Then again, I suppose they have to keep something back for the next film...

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Saturday, April 7, 2012 6:04 PM

AURAPTOR

America loves a winner!



After much ballyhoo, I finally saw The Hunger Games.

Never read the book(s), and have no plans to do so.

So, the movie...

Extremely well done. And while it was over all darker than is generally to my liking, it was nicely filmed and very watchable. The violence, thankfully, was minimized, where it could have been much worse.

There were a couple of issues I did have...

What was up w/ the holo deck attack dogs ? Every bit of technology seemed some what feasible , until these critters. That whole thing seemed just...weird,imo.


And prolly just me, but after Katness set off the mined supply pile, and met up w/ Rue, and she asked if Katness had indeed blown it up, I think a line, something to the effect of.. " How the hell did you not hear that explosion ? " would have done nicely. Seriously... it was huge! And would have been heard for miles around. Oh well.

And Rue... well, there was some predictability there, and through out the movie. Thanks Joss, for teaching me that those dearest and most beloved are the most likely to be taken out, in the most heart wrenching manner.

To quote Jayne... " I saw that comin' " . I know, we all did. Whether we read the book or not.


* Note to everyone* - Do not believe Anthony. He does not know what he thinks he knows on matters concerning of what I think or believe.


" AU, that was great, LOL!! " - Chrisisall

"The world is a dangerous place. Not because of the people who are evil; but because of the people who don't do anything about it." - Albert Einstein


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Sunday, April 8, 2012 4:07 PM

JOURNEY


Quote:

Originally posted by AURaptor:

What was up w/ the holo deck attack dogs ? Every bit of technology seemed some what feasible , until these critters. That whole thing seemed just...weird,imo.




Yeah, I was wondering how they would do that in the movie. Haven't seen it (don't want to give em my money), but my folks saw it and told me about that spot. I found that to be one of the creepiest parts of the book. Those beasts were genetically engineered and

Select to view spoiler:


had the eyes of the previous tributes who had been killed. How and to what extent the wolves were actually the dead tributes, I am not sure, but it was recognizable enough that it felt like they had to kill them twice, especially disturbing when Katniss kills Rue-wolf (at least I think she did, my recollection of that part is a bit fuzzy). So yeah, takes creepy to a whole nother level.

I realize they probably couldn't explain that in the movie, but it was definitely done by the Capitol to up the sadistic factor.

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Monday, April 9, 2012 11:41 AM

AURAPTOR

America loves a winner!


Quote:

Originally posted by Journey:
I realize they probably couldn't explain that in the movie, but it was definitely done by the Capitol to up the sadistic factor.



Eghads... that IS creepifying!

See, mutant killer dogs, I could get. But this stuff ? I think I'll pass on reading the books. I just wanted to check out movie 1, to see what the fuss was all about. Now that I have, I think I'll opt to not follow up on the story.

Which is sorta weird, because I gotta admit, it was a decent flick, and well made. But for some reason, I'm feeling judgmental on this whole story. I mean, what's the point? Where's the redeeming value here ? I've always detested " reality " t.v. , which more and more smacks of The Truman Show, which more than a little too similar to The Hunger Games... I'm just wondering how long it'll be before we start seeing live gladiator bouts to the death. ( Making Star Trek all that much more prophetic a show )

Train of thought done now.

" We're all just folk. " - Mal


" AU, that was great, LOL!! " - Chrisisall

"The world is a dangerous place. Not because of the people who are evil; but because of the people who don't do anything about it." - Albert Einstein


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Monday, April 9, 2012 12:23 PM

RIONAEIRE

Beir bua agus beannacht


Its supposed to be creepy and make you feel uncomfortable. One of the things that scifi has always been used for is cautionary tales, don't go here in real life or else. The creepy thing is that I wonder if, while we're trying to warn the world not to go there, are we creating a self fulfilling prophacy, taking them there faster than they would have otherwise? I still think scifi cautionary tales are a good idea though because the benefits outweigh the creepy self fulfilling prophacy question, if its done well then people won't want to fulfill the prophacy. So we hope.

I assume you're my pal until you let me know otherwise.

"A completely coherant River means writers don't deliver" KatTaya.

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Wednesday, April 11, 2012 11:54 AM

AURAPTOR

America loves a winner!



Riona, I agree with your sentiments. While there are some obvious similarities to other sci-fi movies ( The Running Man, Trueman Show ) , there's also a more disturbing tie in to the current state of our t.v. viewing culture, the 'reality' programs.

We know, that much like " pro " wrestling, these " reality " shows aren't real, in any sense of the word. They're edited, with scenes and situations being scripted, or at least heavily orchestrated, to get the most 'shock and awe' from both participants and viewers alike.

Very much like we see in The Hunger Games.

Now, I know that this sort of 'entertainment' has been going on since before the coliseum in Rome. But how far have we truly evolved, as a society ? From seeing fellow humans fight to the death, to putting humans on t.v. and trying to get them to engage in some sort of confrontation, to making movies about humans fighting each other, to the death, as a part of a t.v. 'reality' game ?

I see an homage to our despicable past, our present, and how both could be used to condition us for what's to come , in the not too distant future.

It use to be that cage fights were banned. Too gory, too brutal. But folks kept on paying to see them. They grew in popularity. Soon, they were available on pay per view. Now, as they grew in popularity, more and more rules were put into place, and we eventually got to a point where they were as accepted as boxing. Today, UFC is far more popular.

How long will it be until we have the first live broadcast of an actual 'death match' ? Oh, sure , it'll be from some back woods, out of the way patch, or on some island, but we all know... you can't stop the signal.

" We're all just folk. " - Mal


" AU, that was great, LOL!! " - Chrisisall

"The world is a dangerous place. Not because of the people who are evil; but because of the people who don't do anything about it." - Albert Einstein


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Wednesday, April 11, 2012 2:23 PM

RIONAEIRE

Beir bua agus beannacht


Well I hope that doesn't happen anytime soon, but we all know it will probably happen eventually because, as they say in Big Fish "Life has a funny way of circling 'round on itself". :( Everything goes in cycles, we like to think we're better than those Spartans, those Romans, those Vikings, those pirates, those royal dictators, but are we really? We only are better if we continue to be vigilant and strive for betterment, otherwise we slip right back there and people wonder how it happened. If you don't know your history you'll repeat it.

That being said though I must confess that me and my dad devotedly watch Survivor each Wed. night. Make of that what you will.

I assume you're my pal until you let me know otherwise.

"A completely coherant River means writers don't deliver" KatTaya.

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Friday, April 13, 2012 10:05 PM

SHINYGOODGUY


That's the whole point of the movie: The Hunger Games is a commentary on the evil side of television, and, in particular, so-called "reality" TV. Using children is a further commentary on the use of our young men and women in the Armed forces to kill and destroy the enemy. Subtle as it is, especially since the love story aspect is played up, it is a cautionary tale of what may come if we allow tyrants to rule the day.

Note also the dividing of the masses into specific groups or districts. Read the books and you'll get a better picture of what it's like to live during a time of major control by the powers that be. It is not necessarily a commentary on government running roughshod over common folk, but rather a commentary on dictatorship. President Snow may be the president, but he rules with an iron fist - sound familiar! Facism only comes in one form - Control, complete and utter control. The Games are a reminder of who's in charge.


SGG

"Let's see how far the rabbit hole takes us"

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Saturday, April 14, 2012 4:38 PM

AURAPTOR

America loves a winner!


Quote:

Originally posted by RionaEire:

That being said though I must confess that me and my dad devotedly watch Survivor each Wed. night. Make of that what you will.

I assume you're my pal until you let me know otherwise.

"A completely coherant River means writers don't deliver" KatTaya.




Both you and your dad are wrong, clearly.





" We're all just folk. " - Mal

" AU, that was great, LOL!! " - Chrisisall

"The world is a dangerous place. Not because of the people who are evil; but because of the people who don't do anything about it." - Albert Einstein


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