REAL WORLD EVENT DISCUSSIONS

Moving Out - New Jersey #1

POSTED BY: SHINYGOODGUY
UPDATED: Thursday, January 17, 2019 17:41
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Thursday, January 17, 2019 2:33 AM

SHINYGOODGUY


New Jersey is now #1 in the country where people are leaving in droves, and jobs is the #1 reason.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/money/markets/people-are-fleeing-from-new-jer
sey-more-than-any-other-state—heres-the-no-1-reason-why/ar-BBS7uMH?ocid=spartandhp


Moving Out

The top outbound states for 2018 were:

1.New Jersey
2.Illinois
3.Connecticut
4.New York
5.Kansas
6.Ohio
7.Massachusetts
8.Iowa
9.Montana
10.Michigan

New Jersey (66.8 percent), which has ranked in the top 10 for the past 10 years, moved up one spot on the outbound list to No. 1. New additions to the 2018 top outbound list include Iowa (55.5 percent), Montana (55 percent) and Michigan (55 percent).

Moving In

The top inbound states of 2018 were:

1.Vermont
2.Oregon
3.Idaho
4.Nevada
5.Arizona
6.South Carolina
7.Washington
8.North Carolina
9.South Dakota
10.District of Columbia

New to the 2018 top inbound list are Arizona at No. 5 and District of Columbia at No. 10, with 60.2 percent and 56.7 percent inbound moves, respectively.


SGG

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Thursday, January 17, 2019 2:45 AM

SHINYGOODGUY


Here's the article:

Quote:

New Jersey became the No. 1 state to move away from in 2018, according to new data from moving and relocation company United Vans Lines.
The top reason why residents left was for a professional opportunity, the UVL data shows. Of all the residents who moved out, 46 percent listed "job" as the deciding factor.

"A leading motivation behind these migration patterns across all regions," in fact, "is a career change," the report says. About "one out of every two people who moved in the past year moved for a new job or company transfer."
The second most compelling reason to relocate, according to the respondents, was retirement, as 24 percent said they preferred to spend their golden years elsewhere . A similar share, 22 percent, said they wanted to be closer to family, while 17 percent listed "lifestyle change" as their reason for moving and 5 percent said "health."

In the map below, the yellow states are "high outbound" states, whereas the dark blue ones are "high inbound."
Still, some people from other parts of the country did move into New Jersey: Of the total moves related to the state, 67 percent were outbound and 33 percent were inbound.

There seems to be a larger trend of residents leaving the Northeast , with the notable exception of Vermont : Connecticut, New York and Massachusetts ranked in the top 10 states where most residents moved out.
"The data aligns with longer-term migration patterns to southern and western states, trends driven by factors like job growth, lower costs of living, state budgetary challenges and more temperate climates," Michael Stoll, economist and professor in the Department of Public Policy at the University of California, Los Angeles, says in the report.

There could also be another reason behind the migration: taxes. While "job opportunities, family considerations and lifestyle preferences are among the primary factors driving a decision to move out-of-state, tax considerations can certainly be a make-it or break-it factor," according to a report from the right-leaning Tax Foundation.

For example, "an individual weighing a decision to relocate among one of several states might be inclined to choose a state with a relatively lower tax burden."
New Jersey is the ninth most tax-burdened state in the country , according to data from financial website WalletHub. Connecticut is the sixth most-taxed state and New York is No. 1.

In fact, five of the 10 worst-performing states on the Tax Foundation's State Business Tax Climate Index — which evaluates states on the competitiveness of their tax rates and structures — are also among the 10 states with the most outbound migration in the UVL report.

While high taxes could be prompting some residents to make a change, a study published in the journal Social Science Research recently found that Americans who live in states that spend tax dollars on public goods like libraries and parks report greater levels of happiness overall.

Regardless, it's not possible to determine whether taxes are driving residents away by looking at the UVL data, since UVL doesn't ask about taxes, specifically, or even money more generally. "Cost of living is not data we currently pull in our survey," United Van Lines director of corporate communications Eily Cummings, tells CNBC Make It .

Still, Cummings says, it makes sense that many residents flee New Jersey because of its exorbitant living expenses. And the state does rank among the top 10 most expensive in America based on the costs of everything from housing to health care.
No matter where you're located, living within your means and employing some common-sense budgeting tactics can help you better manage your money. If you're looking to move out-of-state or are in the market for a new apartment or house, check out these budget hacks and ways to save.




SGG

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Thursday, January 17, 2019 8:12 AM

6IXSTRINGJACK

[/i]


Wow. They must be in pretty bad shape to beat out Illinois.

Do Right, Be Right. :)

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Thursday, January 17, 2019 5:25 PM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


Quote:

Originally posted by SHINYGOODGUY:
Here's the article:

Quote:

New Jersey became the No. 1 state to move away from in 2018, according to new data from moving and relocation company United Vans Lines.
The top reason why residents left was for a professional opportunity, the UVL data shows. Of all the residents who moved out, 46 percent listed "job" as the deciding factor.

"A leading motivation behind these migration patterns across all regions," in fact, "is a career change," the report says. About "one out of every two people who moved in the past year moved for a new job or company transfer."
The second most compelling reason to relocate, according to the respondents, was retirement, as 24 percent said they preferred to spend their golden years elsewhere . A similar share, 22 percent, said they wanted to be closer to family, while 17 percent listed "lifestyle change" as their reason for moving and 5 percent said "health."

In the map below, the yellow states are "high outbound" states, whereas the dark blue ones are "high inbound."
Still, some people from other parts of the country did move into New Jersey: Of the total moves related to the state, 67 percent were outbound and 33 percent were inbound.

There seems to be a larger trend of residents leaving the Northeast , with the notable exception of Vermont : Connecticut, New York and Massachusetts ranked in the top 10 states where most residents moved out.
"The data aligns with longer-term migration patterns to southern and western states, trends driven by factors like job growth, lower costs of living, state budgetary challenges and more temperate climates," Michael Stoll, economist and professor in the Department of Public Policy at the University of California, Los Angeles, says in the report.

There could also be another reason behind the migration: taxes. While "job opportunities, family considerations and lifestyle preferences are among the primary factors driving a decision to move out-of-state, tax considerations can certainly be a make-it or break-it factor," according to a report from the right-leaning Tax Foundation.

For example, "an individual weighing a decision to relocate among one of several states might be inclined to choose a state with a relatively lower tax burden."
New Jersey is the ninth most tax-burdened state in the country , according to data from financial website WalletHub. Connecticut is the sixth most-taxed state and New York is No. 1.

In fact, five of the 10 worst-performing states on the Tax Foundation's State Business Tax Climate Index — which evaluates states on the competitiveness of their tax rates and structures — are also among the 10 states with the most outbound migration in the UVL report.

While high taxes could be prompting some residents to make a change, a study published in the journal Social Science Research recently found that Americans who live in states that spend tax dollars on public goods like libraries and parks report greater levels of happiness overall.

Regardless, it's not possible to determine whether taxes are driving residents away by looking at the UVL data, since UVL doesn't ask about taxes, specifically, or even money more generally. "Cost of living is not data we currently pull in our survey," United Van Lines director of corporate communications Eily Cummings, tells CNBC Make It .

Still, Cummings says, it makes sense that many residents flee New Jersey because of its exorbitant living expenses. And the state does rank among the top 10 most expensive in America based on the costs of everything from housing to health care.
No matter where you're located, living within your means and employing some common-sense budgeting tactics can help you better manage your money. If you're looking to move out-of-state or are in the market for a new apartment or house, check out these budget hacks and ways to save.




SGG

55% what? 55% gave the reason for moving out as jobs? 55% of the State's Population moved out?
What?

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Thursday, January 17, 2019 5:29 PM

THG


One name, only one name responsible for Jerseys problems. Chris Christie...

T



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Thursday, January 17, 2019 5:41 PM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


Here should be the source article:

ST. LOUIS – Jan. 2, 2019 – Americans are on the move, relocating to western and southern parts of the country. The results of United Van Lines’ 42nd Annual National Movers Study, which tracks customers’ state-to-state migration patterns over the past year, revealed that more residents moved out of New Jersey than any other state in 2018, with 66.8 percent of New Jersey moves being outbound. The study also found that the state with the highest percentage of inbound migration was Vermont (72.6 percent), with 234 total moves. Oregon, which had 3,346 total moves, experienced the second highest percentage nationally, with 63.8 percent inbound moves.

States in the Mountain West and Pacific West regions, including Oregon, Idaho (62.4 percent), Nevada (61.8 percent), Washington (58.8 percent) and South Dakota (57 percent) continue to increase in popularity for inbound moves. In tune with this trend, Arizona (60.2 percent) joined the list of top 10 inbound states in 2018.

Several southern states also experienced high percentages of inbound migration, such as South Carolina (59.9 percent) and North Carolina (57 percent). United Van Lines determined the top reasons for moving south include job change (46.6 percent) and retirement (22.3 percent).

In the Northeast, however, an outbound moving trend continues. New Jersey (66.8 percent), Connecticut (62 percent) and New York (61.5 percent) were included among the top 10 outbound states for the fourth consecutive year. Midwestern states like Illinois (65.9 percent), Kansas (58.7 percent), Ohio (56.5 percent) and Iowa (55.5 percent) saw high outbound relocation as well.

“As the nation’s largest household goods mover, our study allows us to identify the most and least popular states for residential relocation throughout the country, year after year,” said Eily Cummings, director of corporate communications at United Van Lines. “These findings accurately reflect not only where Americans are moving to and from, but also the reasons why.”

The National Movers Study reveals the business data of inbound and outbound moves from 2018. In addition to this study, United Van Lines also conducts a survey to find out more about the reasons behind these moves. A leading motivation behind these migration patterns across all regions is a career change, as the survey showed approximately one out of every two people who moved in the past year moved for a new job or company transfer. Other reasons for the high percentage of moves to the Mountain West in 2018 include retirement (28.1 percent), proximity to family (20.8 percent) and lifestyle change (19.4 percent). Compared to all other states, Idaho saw the largest influx of new residents desiring a lifestyle change (25.95 percent), and more people flocked to New Mexico for retirement than any other state (42.74 percent).

“The data collected by United Van Lines aligns with longer-term migration patterns to southern and western states, trends driven by factors like job growth, lower costs of living, state budgetary challenges and more temperate climates,” said Michael Stoll, economist and professor in the Department of Public Policy at the University of California, Los Angeles. “Unlike a few decades ago, retirees are leaving California, instead choosing other states in the Pacific West and Mountain West. We’re also seeing young professionals migrating to vibrant, metropolitan economies, like Washington, D.C. and Seattle.”

Moving In

The top inbound states of 2018 were:

Vermont
Oregon
Idaho
Nevada
Arizona
South Carolina
Washington
North Carolina
South Dakota
District of Columbia

New to the 2018 top inbound list are Arizona at No. 5 and District of Columbia at No. 10, with 60.2 percent and 56.7 percent inbound moves, respectively.

Moving Out

The top outbound states for 2018 were:

New Jersey
Illinois
Connecticut
New York
Kansas
Ohio
Massachusetts
Iowa
Montana
Michigan

New Jersey (66.8 percent), which has ranked in the top 10 for the past 10 years, moved up one spot on the outbound list to No. 1. New additions to the 2018 top outbound list include Iowa (55.5 percent), Montana (55 percent) and Michigan (55 percent).

Balanced

In several states, the number of residents moving inbound was approximately the same as the number moving outbound. Arkansas and Mississippi are among these “balanced states.”

Since 1977, United Van Lines has annually tracked migration patterns on a state-by-state basis. The 2018 study is based on household moves handled by United within the 48 contiguous states and Washington, D.C. and ranks states based off the inbound and outbound percentages of total moves in each state. United classifies states as “high inbound” if 55 percent or more of the moves are going into a state, “high outbound” if 55 percent or more moves were coming out of a state or “balanced” if the difference between inbound and outbound is negligible.

To view the entire 2018 study, an interactive map and archived press releases from United, visit the United Van Lines website.

Click here for our blog post on the top ten states to move to!
Click here for our blog post on the top ten states to retire!
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Media Inquiry

For more information on United or if you are a member of the press and have questions/comments, please email our Director of Communications by clicking below:

Eily_Cummings@unigroup.com
PRESS KIT:
United Van Lines
2018 National
Movers Study

Press Release, Map and Data
Download Now



https://www.unitedvanlines.com/contact-united/news/movers-study-2018

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