REAL WORLD EVENT DISCUSSIONS

MOST INFLUENTIAL BOOKS AND MOVIES, AND WHY

POSTED BY: SIGNYM
UPDATED: Wednesday, June 6, 2012 19:20
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Sunday, May 27, 2012 6:00 PM

SIGNYM

I believe in solving problems, not sharing them.


Gotta share some of the books and movies that have really influenced my thinking.

The Worldly Philosophers by Robert Heilbroner. An economic theory history book which shows the struggles and passions and progression of economic thought.

Man Against Myth by Barrows Dunham. It talks about some of our basic assumptions of how society works... assumptions which are SO basic we don't even know they're there. Traces the progression from reliance on religion as our essential paradigm for how things "should be" (Middle Ages) to our shift into revering nature and the "natural man" as our underlying paradigm (age of Enlightenment). Reading about these assumptions made me smack my forehead and realize the peril of unconscious thought.

Descent of Woman by Elaine Morgan. This was another one of those books that caused me to smack my forehead. I may not be able to come up with good ideas, but I can recognize them when I read them! Morgan details the variety of ways that humans are unique among the apes (including upright posture, diving reflex, fat layer, and loss of fur) and accounts for these differences by postulating an aquatic portion of human evolution. I have to say, as I look at our macro- and micro-nutrient requirements (taurine, omega-3, iodine, and vitamins A &D) it only adds to the hypothesis. I think Dr Hardy (the person who originally came up with the idea) and Elaine Morgan are correct.

An article on the red deer of Scotland in Science by Clutton Brock. It led me to realize several things... (1)Males which do not participate in the raising of young are banished from the protection of the herd/ flock to die, since they would otherwise compete for food resources. (2) This creates vicious aggression among males, and sexual dimorphism which can become an evolutionary dead end. But evolution, species survival, and mating strategies... it's ALL about the kids, yanno?

Hearts and Minds A compilation of journalists' pictures and movies of the Vietnam War... the stuff they DIDN'T put on TV. Up until then, I think I intellectually understood that people around the world were suffering. After that movie, I felt it. It put a permanent kink in my sympathies; I could no longer think about war and exploitation without being sad, and angry.

What about you? What have you seen or read that taught you something, or let you look at the world in a new way?




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Sunday, May 27, 2012 6:14 PM

SIGNYM

I believe in solving problems, not sharing them.


Oh, and FIREFLY. It got me on this board, talking to you all. I've learned a lot about people and have changed my mind about some things.

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Sunday, May 27, 2012 6:17 PM

6IXSTRINGJACK


1) 1984 - If you've ever read it, you know why. 'Nuff Said.....

2) Brave New World - If you ever read 1984 and wanted a possible happy ending to it, you also know why.

3) Animal Farm - Can you believe that my "Great Aunt" (my grandmother's sister) gave me to read as a child?

I never read it back then. I thought it was a "book" version of Charlotte's Web. NOT AT ALL... Stephen King, short of The Mist, couldn't have ever made a scarier story in his life....

Why would a rich old broad who was going to pass and not give any of the wealth to our side of the family send me this book at 11 years old? How different would I be today had I read it then?

Freddy Kruger.... this book is the scariest thing I've ever read, and that includes 1984



As for movies, here's my top 5 today.... (granted, this changes often)
1. Donnie Darko.... I refuese to read the online explanations and will probably enjoy this movie until I die without understanding it completely.

2. INK..... I can't tell you ANYTHING about this movie without spoiling something. Just watch it. It's Indie, but it's VERY well done..... It's the favorite movie of everybody I've suggested it to. (The only spoiler I will provide is that an entire episode of FRINGE was based off of this concept, and they did a great job of making it their own)

3. Mululland Drive - Overall, it's much less intriguing than Donnie Darko in my mind, but something about the scene behind Denny's still scares the shit out of me.

4. Little Shop of Horrors.......

F U for hating me for it.....

I categorically HATE musicals. I grew up with this one though, even though I wasn't aware it was a remake that Jack Nicholson semi-starred in black and white before One Flew Over the Co-co's Nest!

Rick Morannis and Steve Martin at their very best....

5. CUBE.... All of them together.....

Cube one was amazing. Cube 2 was what you would expect. Cube Zero made it all come together....

You don't have to actually be living in the Cube to be in the cube....




On an aside, PI to me was overatted.... It was good, but it was no B/W flick on the par of Clerks.....

And on that note.... F Clerks 2 and the commercialization!!!!!!!

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Monday, May 28, 2012 11:17 AM

SIGNYM

I believe in solving problems, not sharing them.


Well, on the subject of good and evil, I was highly influenced by

A Wrinkle in Time by Madelaine L'Engle. It can't be explained. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Wrinkle_in_Time

Also, much later That Hideous Strength by CS Lewis. The description of how one can get sucked into evil because it is presented as mundane...

I'm not a religious person and both of these writers are religious, with religious elements in each story. Nonetheless, the descriptions of evil are frightening.

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Monday, May 28, 2012 2:18 PM

PIRATENEWS

John Lee, conspiracy therapist at Hollywood award-winner History Channel-mocked SNL-spoofed PirateNew.org wooHOO!!!!!!


Quote:

Originally posted by 6IXSTRINGJACK:

1) 1984 - If you've ever read it, you know why. 'Nuff Said.....

2) Brave New World - If you ever read 1984 and wanted a possible happy ending to it, you also know why.

3) Animal Farm - Can you believe that my "Great Aunt" (my grandmother's sister) gave me to read as a child?



Everyone should read these Presidential Operations Manuals.

4) Conan The Barbarian - To understand how to treat the womens and deal with Bad Guys.

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Monday, May 28, 2012 6:16 PM

ANTHONYT

Freedom is Important because People are Important


Hello,

I'll throw Fahrenheit 451 and Ender's Game into the mix. Two good sci-fi novels with important messages about indoctrination and censorship.

--Anthony


Note to Self:
Raptor - women who want to control their reproductive processes are sluts.
Wulf - Niki is a stupid fucking bitch who should hurry up and die.
Never forget what these men are.
“The stupid neither forgive nor forget; the naive forgive and forget; the wise forgive but do not forget.” -Thomas Szasz

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Monday, May 28, 2012 7:03 PM

1KIKI

Today, scientists sound the alarm on other environmental dangers. Vested interests still hire their own scientists to confuse the issue. But in the end, nature will not be fooled. Neil deGrasse Tyson


I read The Aquatic Ape which makes more and more sense as time goes on.

Another book was Mother Love with traced the myths of said subject, including the fact of large-scale abandonment of children due to either economic choice (others can look after them) or economic necessity. It traced the development of the idea of natural mother love through the Enlightenment up through today. What really sold me on the idea of ideal mother love as a socially instilled value was the amount of research that went into it, from parish records and bible inscriptions through census figures and on to parish sermons and Enlightenment writings.

There was a snippet of a study I read which traced the ideals of beauty in cultures through time and around the globe as expressions of wealth, which are applicable to this day. Every time I look at a model, I snicker inside a little.

Fisch and Spehlmann's EEG Primer was a revelation in how the brain wildly remodels itself during adolescence. I understood at least partially the idea of the mind as a product of the brain.

Jared Diamond's Collapse was also very thought-provoking. I keep throwing ideas against it to see what breaks and what sticks.

I don't have any films to mention, but certain pieces of music speak to me in a language for which I have no words. They remind me that there are different ways of knowing about the world.


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Monday, May 28, 2012 7:24 PM

6IXSTRINGJACK


Quote:

Originally posted by ANTHONYT:
I'll throw Fahrenheit 451 and Ender's Game into the mix. Two good sci-fi novels with important messages about indoctrination and censorship.



Ooooooh.... Ender's Game. The only one on this list so far I've read and the only one in the series I've read as well.

AMAZING story. I couldn't put the book down, and that's saying a LOT since it takes me a LONG time to finish a book. I do plan on reading more of series someday, and it's "Bean" offshoots. I just hope any of the other stories match up at all to the origin.

If you haven't read it already Anthony, I think you'd also really like Card's "Empire" as well. In some ways, it's much more futuristic than EG, simply because we've advanced so much technologically as a species since then, but it takes place today. Apparently it was so popular that it spawned a XBox Live Arcade game entitled "Shadow Complex", a Metroid-esque game-style based story that I felt complemented the Empire book in a way I've never before experienced.

As a side, I think it's really cool how video games today are becoming a serious media and that when excecuted as well as a tie in with another genre as this game was, playing through an experience that touched you as deeply as only a great novel could is really a unique experience. I do hope we see more book tie-ins in the video game industry in the future. We've had movie adaptations for 20 years in the industry, and as any gamer knows, 99% of them really suck.

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Monday, May 28, 2012 7:34 PM

6IXSTRINGJACK


Quote:

Originally posted by PIRATENEWS:
Quote:

Originally posted by 6IXSTRINGJACK:

1) 1984 - If you've ever read it, you know why. 'Nuff Said.....

2) Brave New World - If you ever read 1984 and wanted a possible happy ending to it, you also know why.

3) Animal Farm - Can you believe that my "Great Aunt" (my grandmother's sister) gave me to read as a child?



Everyone should read these Presidential Operations Manuals.

4) Conan The Barbarian - To understand how to treat the womens and deal with Bad Guys.



Seriously man... As much as I enjoyed them, I'm afraid to even read any of them again. The first two books seriously changed my life at 22-23 years old, and some days I really wish I'd never read them. They really had a DRAMATIC impact on my life and my view of the world. I'd never even really paid any attention to politics at all before then. I don't exactly know the mindset behind why these books have been all but banned from public school today, I do understand that anything written that is so unbelievably powerful and potentially true isn't something They'd want taking any time away from the "good people" who would be better off putting their off-work hours wondering who will win Dancing With the Stars this season.

I didn't read Animal Farm until I was about 30 years old, so I don't think the life-long effects were as dramatic, especially since I was already living in the rabbit hole for about 7-8 years prior, but my GOD was that a powerful story.

I REALLY wonder how my life would have been different had I red that when I was given it at 11 years old. I really wish my great-aunt was still alive today and I could find out if she sent that to me because she unknowingly thought it was Charlotte's Web, or because she had some other mysterious reason for wanting me to read it at that age. We were not close at all, and I may have only seen her twice a year at most at family parties. The only thing she probably knew about me was that I enjoyed reading very much at that age. Aside from sci-fi short story collections my dad rented from the library though, most of my reading was filler crap from the Troll book club at school, usually in the "scary stories" area.

All that time I had the scariest story ever written sitting on my bookshelf and I never even cracked it open.....


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Tuesday, May 29, 2012 7:56 AM

CAVETROLL


So many books on this list that I've read. Here's some of my favorites;
The Moon is a Harsh Mistress
Farnham's Freehold
Starship Troopers
all by Robert A. Heinlein. They called him the Dean of Science Fiction, and these are 3 of the reasons. Freehold and Troopers are from Heinlein's juveniles, and they are rousing adventure tales for young minds, but pose some ethical dilemmas for older readers. Moon is a blueprint for how to run a revolution.

Lucifer's Hammer by Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle. Excellent TEOTWAWKI novel before the genre had been named.

Dungeon, Fire and Sword by John J. Robinson. A history of the Knights Templar. Innovation and politics, with a side helping of betrayal.

Crusade in Europe by Dwight D. Eisenhower. Brings to light the battles fought off the battlefield, and the massive logistical effort it took to win.

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Tuesday, May 29, 2012 1:25 PM

RIONAEIRE

Beir bua agus beannacht


Sarah and I watched the movie of Animal Farm in middle school, we went into it not knowing what to expect and finished it really scared, didn't want to turn out the lights that night when we got in bed. Its a great thing, book or movie, to experience at that age and get to thinking about.

I assume you're my pal until you let me know otherwise.

"A completely coherant River means writers don't deliver" KatTaya.

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Tuesday, May 29, 2012 3:31 PM

FREMDFIRMA



Actually the stand-put piece for Orwells work for me is: Homage to Catalonia.

Also noteworthy.
The Wave, by Todd Strasser under the pen name Morton Rhue.
The 1981 Movie is also well worth watching.

It Can't Happen Here, by Sinclair Lewis.

Catch-22, by Joseph Heller.

More later, maybe - busy day today.

-F

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Tuesday, May 29, 2012 3:58 PM

6IXSTRINGJACK


Quote:

Originally posted by RionaEire:
Sarah and I watched the movie of Animal Farm in middle school, we went into it not knowing what to expect and finished it really scared, didn't want to turn out the lights that night when we got in bed. Its a great thing, book or movie, to experience at that age and get to thinking about.

I assume you're my pal until you let me know otherwise.

"A completely coherant River means writers don't deliver" KatTaya.



I didn't even know there was an Animal Farm movie. I'm sure if it did the book any justice at all that it would be terrifying for a 7-8th grader.

Actually, even though I like Lenard Nemois, I HATE the fact that I watched the "Brave New World" movie. Don't get me wrong, it was done very well I thought, although the end was changed in "Hollywood Fashion", which to me negates the entire effort. The thing that I hate about watching a movie is that you're watching a heavily edited version of somebody elses vision of the book, leaving you as just a spectator.

If you haven't yet, I STRONGLY recommend reading the book all these years later. No matter how good the movie was, no movie can ever compare to the book because when you read an excellent story like this, from the very first page you're essentially entering into a partnership with the author until the very last page. Not only do you benefit greatly from reading word for word exactly the picture that the author originally imagined unedited, but you also read it differently than any other person would and your own imagination based off of your temperament and past experiences is the "wildcard" Character in the story that is probably more important than any of the characters the author wrote about.


Aside from the very rare instance of those "night terror" dreams I might have once every 2 or 3 years or so, it's been a long time since I've needed a night light. By the time I finally read Animal Farm, it scared me to the core in a way that no laughable slasher flick that even Ron Zombie could make would do.....

He was able to make these animal characters more human than most humans I've ever known, and while you'll find yourself rooting for the good guys, you'll find that Orwell (even though I believe he was one of the good guys) had a capacity inside him for evil that Hitler or Stalin would have envied. It's a good thing for us he just wrote what PN calls "Presidential Manuals", instead of living out the fantasy.

There is no way that you could express that evil so eloquently in written word unless there was a capacity inside of you to exercise it someday.


Seriously Riona, even if you read as slow as I do and it takes you a few weeks of light reading before you go to bed, put this one on your list.

Quote:

Originally posted by FREMDFIRMA:

Actually the stand-put piece for Orwells work for me is: Homage to Catalonia.

Also noteworthy.
The Wave, by Todd Strasser under the pen name Morton Rhue.
The 1981 Movie is also well worth watching.

It Can't Happen Here, by Sinclair Lewis.

Catch-22, by Joseph Heller.

More later, maybe - busy day today.

-F



A "stand out" piece from Orwell that could even attempt to match the profound effect of reading 1984 or Animal Farm.......

Even knowing that you're the type to shun conventional wisdom (takes one to know one), I'd have to say that you're probably the only person in my life still alive who'd I'd even take such a claim seriously.

I've honestly never heard of it.

I'd like to hear more about it from you, rather than look it up on Amazon.com and get the publisher's description.

How on earth did you find it to be more moving than 1984 or Animal Farm?

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Tuesday, May 29, 2012 4:00 PM

KWICKO

"We'll know our disinformation program is complete when everything the American public believes is false." -- William Casey, Reagan's presidential campaign manager & CIA Director (from first staff meeting in 1981)


Quote:

Originally posted by CaveTroll:

Lucifer's Hammer by Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle. Excellent TEOTWAWKI novel before the genre had been named.



"You can fly. But we control the lightning."

Lucifer's Hammer had a huge impact on me as a child.

I've got Ender's Game in my Amazon queue at the moment, probably next in line for my reading list.

The Lathe of Heaven, by Ursula K. LeGuin made a big impact on me. The idea of, what if you could change things. REALLY change things? And the idea of unintended consequences of those changes.

Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? So much to wrap your head around in this one. What is life? What am I? How do I know?

Movies:

2001: A Space Odyssey. Obviously this was a life-changer, since I was about 6 years old when I saw it in the theater. Made an enormous impact, even though I didn't really "get it" until later.

A Man For All Seasons. It's not WHAT Sir Thomas More believed that impressed me about this movie, it's THAT he believed it, so much that he was willing to die rather than recant his belief. And the dialog and wordplay in this version are just spectacular.

Blade Runner. I actually like the movie better than the book it's adapted from. Yes, blasphemy, I know. I don't care.

Other books and movies too numerous to mention.

1984, Brave New World, Animal Farm, Fahrenheit 451... All great reads. As a kid, I got hooked on sci-fi by two books: Star Rangers by Andre Norton and Orphans of the Sky by Heinlein.





"I supported Bush in 2000 and 2004 and intellegence [sic] had very little to do with that decision." - Hero


"I've not watched the video either, or am incapable of intellectually dealing with the substance of this thread, so I'll instead act like a juvenile and claim victory..." - Rappy

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Tuesday, May 29, 2012 4:31 PM

6IXSTRINGJACK


Wow... Kwick....

You were actually able to sit through 2001.... and enjoy it on top of it?????

I didn't see that movie until my Film class in college, but it was agonizing for me to sit through. Even my teacher said he hated the movie, but it HAD to be taught in the class.

Quote:

"Will someone tell me what in the hell this is about?"

Rock Hudson as he walked out of the premiere before the film ended. Imdb.com



http://voices.yahoo.com/2001-space-odyssey-movie-changed-movies-133052
7.html?cat=40


We'll definatiley not ever peg you in the potentially ADD crowd Kwick.

I understand the merits of 2001, and realize fully that it was a pioneer movie, and that MANY not-so-good-to-great movies need to thank Kuberick and Clark for their vision today, it was hands down the most slow-paced and boring movie I've ever watched. That's also saying a lot, since we watched Citizen Kane (Considered to be the BEST MOVIE EVER MADE in the snob circles) in that class, which I found to be as equally painful to sit through, but at least it didn't pretend to be Sci-Fi.


I'm not, for a second attacking your choice to put this so high up on your list. I'd never attack a persons personal tastes in music, movies or books. I just don't understand it, and furthermore, I even admire it.

Good for you man.... you probably thought Citizen Kane was excellent as well. I just can't wrap my head around either of them... not because I'm not intelligent enough to, but because they both lost me at "Hello".....



The only interesting, and very weird thing that I can add to this, is that when I was a kid, I was inexcusably terrified of that main orchestra song from 2001 and my 2 year younger brother was only 3 and he loved it. They played that song everywhere from the radio to Sesemie Street in the way early 80's. I remember getting in trouble one day when running to the TV and turning it off before the "Duh-Duh!!!!!!! BONG BONG BONG BONG BONG BONG BONG!!!!!!! part....





LOL.... maybe I just hate the movie because I had to relive that experience and hadn't heard that song in 20 years. Listening to it again today makes my skin crawl.....

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Tuesday, May 29, 2012 9:21 PM

FREMDFIRMA


Quote:

Originally posted by 6IXSTRINGJACK:
A "stand out" piece from Orwell that could even attempt to match the profound effect of reading 1984 or Animal Farm.......

Even knowing that you're the type to shun conventional wisdom (takes one to know one), I'd have to say that you're probably the only person in my life still alive who'd I'd even take such a claim seriously.

I've honestly never heard of it.

I'd like to hear more about it from you, rather than look it up on Amazon.com and get the publisher's description.

How on earth did you find it to be more moving than 1984 or Animal Farm?



Well Jack - the REASON it stands out is that Orwell was actually THERE, during the Spanish Civil War, when the alliance shattered and the Communists and Socialists, who were originally down for "freedom" with the Anarchists, showed their true colors and jumped on board with the Fascists...
Cause all of them bastards really want Government, and the only real argument between THEM wasn't over gettin in the car, it was over who got to drive - and when they realized the Anarchists really meant that shit, EVERYONE turned on them.

This is, mind you, why Anarchists despise Socialists and Communists - up till then they'd been staunch allies, but obviously Anarchists are a threat to anyone who wants Government.
Also, America supported Franco, wholeheartedly, throughout his entire reign well into the 70's.
Hell, America was and still is extremely pro-Fascist, they just don't ADMIT it.
http://www.rationalrevolution.net/war/american_supporters_of_the_europ
.htm


That said, SOME americans did *not* support Franco, and snuck over there to form the "Abraham Lincoln Brigade"(1) and fought for the Anarchists.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abraham_Lincoln_Brigade
(1) This demonstrates a shocking ignorance of history cause Lincoln and Franco would have got on REAL good!

Of course, Anarchists being Anarchists, and foolishly trying to wage a conventional war on up to five fronts at once without any organization, it was kind of a foregone conclusion.
IMHO - the biggest mistake they made was trying to play the game by the enemies rules, it killed them, in the end, and crippled them from the beginning.
But see, again, Orwell was *THERE*, present and in person, at pointblank range and he saw with his own eyes the "true colors" of those involved.

And thus he wrote Homage to Catalonia.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homage_to_Catalonia

It was his experiences there, I think, which solidly influenced all his future works and the basis on which they were written, essentially this being the "root" of all his other work, but that's just my opinion.

Here's some more on that for you - folks like to dispute my words in regards to how Anarchists actually fight when forced to, thinking they meekly knuckle under like everyone else - they don't.
I *seriously* encourage you to read this bit, if no other.
http://www.english.illinois.edu/maps/scw/anarchist.htm


Oh yes, and Movies - Demolition Man.
Cause I swear that damn flick looks more prescient every day.

-F

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Wednesday, May 30, 2012 1:55 AM

KWICKO

"We'll know our disinformation program is complete when everything the American public believes is false." -- William Casey, Reagan's presidential campaign manager & CIA Director (from first staff meeting in 1981)


Sat through it more than once, Jack. More than several times, in fact. Bought it on VHS, then DVD, then Blu-Ray, too.

If you really need it explained to you, the sequel, 2010 does a passable job of dumbing it down quite a bit for mass consumption. Clarke's short story "The Sentinel" does a far better job, though, as it was the jumping-off point for the movie.

2001 set the stage for pretty much every space movie that followed, including Star Wars, in its look and modeling, but 2001 is one of the very rare few to pay attention to the "space" part of things, where explosions are silent...


Citizen Kane actually is a pretty awesome movie, if for no other reason than just the movie-making aspects of it. Watch it again sometime, and look at the innovations it brought - long tracking shots, up buildings and through windows - things that are commonplace now, but considered all but impossible at the time the movie was made. Orson Welles was the James Cameron of his time in a lot of ways - when others said something couldn't be done, he just invented new ways of doing it and carried on...



"I supported Bush in 2000 and 2004 and intellegence [sic] had very little to do with that decision." - Hero


"I've not watched the video either, or am incapable of intellectually dealing with the substance of this thread, so I'll instead act like a juvenile and claim victory..." - Rappy

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Wednesday, May 30, 2012 3:52 AM

BYTEMITE


Jack: Unfortunately, video games appear to be becoming the thought control bread and circuses new time sink for everyone.

/hypocrite who plays video games.

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Wednesday, May 30, 2012 5:36 AM

KWICKO

"We'll know our disinformation program is complete when everything the American public believes is false." -- William Casey, Reagan's presidential campaign manager & CIA Director (from first staff meeting in 1981)


Quote:

Originally posted by BYTEMITE:
Jack: Unfortunately, video games appear to be becoming the thought control bread and circuses new time sink for everyone.

/hypocrite who plays video games.




I have a hard time getting into video games. At the moment, there's only one I play with any regularity: Gran Turismo 5. I just haven't seen any others that would be enticing enough for me to go out and buy either a console or a dedicated PC to play them on.



"I supported Bush in 2000 and 2004 and intellegence [sic] had very little to do with that decision." - Hero


"I've not watched the video either, or am incapable of intellectually dealing with the substance of this thread, so I'll instead act like a juvenile and claim victory..." - Rappy

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Wednesday, May 30, 2012 5:45 AM

BYTEMITE


Hmm, you're fortunate. I'd rather not play games, but for some reason people I know want me to, and then once I get started the competitive perfectionist 100% completion parts of my personality kick in.

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Wednesday, May 30, 2012 6:14 PM

OONJERAH



OCD much?
Not ready to defend this opinion, but:
Giving in to perfectionism is a bad idea.
Cultivating one's perfectionism is a terrible idea.
For most folks, it's inevitable self-defeat.

Movies: Out of Africa; Driving Miss Daisy.
Both great; I never analyzed why.

=========================
I am convinced that life is 10% what happens to me and 90% of how I react to it. ~Charles R Swindoll

If I have to react to others all the time, then they own my mind more than I do.
If I let others tell me how to feel, I lose my ability to choose happiness.
If I let others tell me who I am, I've vacated self-definition.
Finally, I realized how foolish I was to give others such power over me.

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Wednesday, May 30, 2012 7:42 PM

RIONAEIRE

Beir bua agus beannacht


I think Byte does enjoy her videogames, even though they eat up time, I think the time eating part is what she objects to rather than the playing of the games.

I assume you're my pal until you let me know otherwise.

"A completely coherant River means writers don't deliver" KatTaya.

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Wednesday, May 30, 2012 11:37 PM

JONGSSTRAW

We carry in our hearts the true country, and that cannot be stolen.


Casablanca is one of my favorite movies. The new dvd has interesting cast and backstory notes including the Nazi Major Strasser, played by Conrad Veidt, had been an outspoken critic of Hitler in Germany and fled to America to avoid arrest by the SS. The majority of the patrons in Rick's Cafe were actual refugees from Nazi-occupied France, and when they stood up to sing La Marsielles, they were singing from the heart. Ingrid Bergman's stunning beauty, and Bogart's amazing acting skills make this movie timeless and pure joy to watch.



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Thursday, May 31, 2012 4:17 AM

BYTEMITE


Quote:

OCD much?


OBVIOUSLY. Take a pie chart of percentages of the population with some mental disorder, hang it on a wall, use it as a dart board. If you hit one, I probably have it.

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Thursday, May 31, 2012 12:36 PM

MAGONSDAUGHTER


Books

Catcher in the Rye JD Salinger
Nineteen Eighty Four - George Orwell
To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee
The Road - Cormac McCarthy
lord of the Rings - Tolkein
Cloudstreet - Tim Winton






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Thursday, May 31, 2012 2:01 PM

6IXSTRINGJACK


Quote:

Originally posted by Kwicko:
Sat through it more than once, Jack. More than several times, in fact. Bought it on VHS, then DVD, then Blu-Ray, too.

If you really need it explained to you, the sequel, 2010 does a passable job of dumbing it down quite a bit for mass consumption. Clarke's short story "The Sentinel" does a far better job, though, as it was the jumping-off point for the movie.

2001 set the stage for pretty much every space movie that followed, including Star Wars, in its look and modeling, but 2001 is one of the very rare few to pay attention to the "space" part of things, where explosions are silent...


Citizen Kane actually is a pretty awesome movie, if for no other reason than just the movie-making aspects of it. Watch it again sometime, and look at the innovations it brought - long tracking shots, up buildings and through windows - things that are commonplace now, but considered all but impossible at the time the movie was made. Orson Welles was the James Cameron of his time in a lot of ways - when others said something couldn't be done, he just invented new ways of doing it and carried on...



"I supported Bush in 2000 and 2004 and intellegence [sic] had very little to do with that decision." - Hero


"I've not watched the video either, or am incapable of intellectually dealing with the substance of this thread, so I'll instead act like a juvenile and claim victory..." - Rappy



Hey Kwick,

Nah... I don't need it explained to me. Although I hated watching it, I didn't sleep through it and I understood it... at least my subconscious mind sat through it. Given a different, more fast paced vision, I think it could have been a great movie (in my mind). It certainly was a great concept, and as we both mentioned before that so many sci-fi movies today have a lot of thanking to do for the vision this movie put out there. (Although, I'd say that as far as the story itself goes, there were MUCH better concepts that predated it by up to 50 years in novel and short story form)

But really, when you took out all of they symphony pieces coupled with mind-numbingly long periods of time where nothing happened out in space, this could have been condensed down to an excellent 30 minute short film. I'm sure if you love going to the symphony, you'd love this movie... the Sci-Fi background would just be a bonus. You may not be older than me, but I assume you are. If you are, you have to remember that this movie came out around the time I was born, and I didn't see it for the first time until I was like 23 years old. "The Thing" aged very well, as did the first two Aliens movies, 2001 however, I believe is just downright painful to watch for most people under 32 years old today. I don't think you'd find any single person under 20 years old today that would be able to even sit through this or Citizen Kane without their wrists strapped down and toothpicks holding their eyes open.



I'll give you 100% that the cinematography was extremely influential to its genre and to every movie to come out afterward. I'll also give that to Citizen Kane. That's, personally, all I can give to it. As a case-study based on those parameters, I can't deny the facts.

It's just..... just..... THEY'RE BOTH SO INCREDIBLY BORING TO SIT THROUGH!!!!!!

Even my old man never watched it to the end, and he didn't like the original Star Wars Trilogy!!!! I just find that funny because he's rarely ever read a book that wasn't sci-fi, and his reason's for never watching any of them more than once are the exact opposite for my same reasons for 2001. He felt that Star-Wars had too little interesting plot, and it was too fast paced and disjointed.





Quote:

Originally posted by Kwicko:
Quote:

Originally posted by BYTEMITE:
Jack: Unfortunately, video games appear to be becoming the thought control bread and circuses new time sink for everyone.

/hypocrite who plays video games.




I have a hard time getting into video games. At the moment, there's only one I play with any regularity: Gran Turismo 5. I just haven't seen any others that would be enticing enough for me to go out and buy either a console or a dedicated PC to play them on.



Quote:

Originally posted by BYTEMITE:
Hmm, you're fortunate. I'd rather not play games, but for some reason people I know want me to, and then once I get started the competitive perfectionist 100% completion parts of my personality kick in.



Quote:

Originally posted by Oonjerah:
OCD much?
Not ready to defend this opinion, but:
Giving in to perfectionism is a bad idea.
Cultivating one's perfectionism is a terrible idea.
For most folks, it's inevitable self-defeat.



Quote:

Originally posted by BYTEMITE:
Quote:

OCD much?


OBVIOUSLY. Take a pie chart of percentages of the population with some mental disorder, hang it on a wall, use it as a dart board. If you hit one, I probably have it.



Gran Turismo, of any variety, is a safe game overall.

It's the Skyrims and Oblivions and Final Fantasies and Fallouts and Grand Theft Autos and all of the other countless 2D and 3D offshoots of these types of games that can SERIOUSLY kill all of your free time if you allow them to. Hell... I just bought Torchlight for XBox360 in the marketplace recently. I think the average completion time for the game stated was somewhere around 20 hours for a 16 dollar game. I've sunk well over 100-150 hours into it though. There's 3 separate characters you can playthrough, and you can max their levels to 99. I'm playing 2 of them and one is only at 42, and the other is at 62. There's also items called "embers" you collect along the way that you can combine to get the most powerful weapons. Even though you actually "beat" the game at around level 30, I've gotten much further than that on two separate characters after the main quest is done, and I'm just barely half-way to making the "Unique Embers"

2 "cracked embers" = 1 "dull ember"
2 "dull embers" = 1 "discolored ember"
2 "discolored embers" = 1 "ember"
2 "embers" = 1 "cut ember"
2 "cut embers" = 1 "polished ember"
2 "polished embers" = 1 "star ember"
2 "star embers" = 1 "flawless ember"
2 "flawless embers" = 1 "perfect ember"
2 "perfect embers" = 1 "shard ember"

So to get 1 "Shard ember" it means you need to find 512 "cracked embers", and there are 9 varieties of embers, meaning 4,608 cracked embers need to be found, assuming you NEVER find a duplicate. So far, I have flawless embers and several flawless+star+more combinations for nearly every ember type, but the game's already been beaten. There are no more meaningless XBox Achievements to be had.....

Why do I continue on, when my character is already leveled up so high that it's actually almost boring to even play other than to get maybe 20 more cracked embers per 20 minutes of game time?????

I feel for ya Byte.... This is really swiftly becoming an epidemic amongst a LOT of people, and now that a lot of the kids who grew up with the problems are becoming adults, I'm sure it's going to be harder for them to tell their kids not to play so many video games.

The irony of this whole video game part of the post, is how I just talked equally as long about how boring 2001 was, and I'll bet that even though Kwick has owned the movie in 3 different formats over his lifetime, he's spent less cumulative time watching that movie than I have in the last 2 months playing torchlight.



Quote:

Originally posted by Magonsdaughter:
Books

Catcher in the Rye JD Salinger
Nineteen Eighty Four - George Orwell
To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee
The Road - Cormac McCarthy
lord of the Rings - Tolkein
Cloudstreet - Tim Winton



Oooh... Catcher... great book. I still can't even describe why I liked it so much. Another nod to 1984 as well :)

I saw the movie The Road. I really would like to read the book someday, but I'll have to do it years from now. It's always hard for me to read a book AFTER watching the movie.

Speaking of which, "Angela's Ashes" is another I'd like to read one day. Saw that one when I was 21 years old and it still stands out in my mind. I remember watching it with my gf and her parents and saying something along the lines of "this movie makes me feel petty about any single thing I've ever complained about in my life".

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Thursday, May 31, 2012 2:10 PM

6IXSTRINGJACK


Quote:

Originally posted by FREMDFIRMA:
Quote:

Originally posted by 6IXSTRINGJACK:
A "stand out" piece from Orwell that could even attempt to match the profound effect of reading 1984 or Animal Farm.......

Even knowing that you're the type to shun conventional wisdom (takes one to know one), I'd have to say that you're probably the only person in my life still alive who'd I'd even take such a claim seriously.

I've honestly never heard of it.

I'd like to hear more about it from you, rather than look it up on Amazon.com and get the publisher's description.

How on earth did you find it to be more moving than 1984 or Animal Farm?



Well Jack - the REASON it stands out is that Orwell was actually THERE, during the Spanish Civil War, when the alliance shattered and the Communists and Socialists, who were originally down for "freedom" with the Anarchists, showed their true colors and jumped on board with the Fascists...
Cause all of them bastards really want Government, and the only real argument between THEM wasn't over gettin in the car, it was over who got to drive - and when they realized the Anarchists really meant that shit, EVERYONE turned on them.

This is, mind you, why Anarchists despise Socialists and Communists - up till then they'd been staunch allies, but obviously Anarchists are a threat to anyone who wants Government.
Also, America supported Franco, wholeheartedly, throughout his entire reign well into the 70's.
Hell, America was and still is extremely pro-Fascist, they just don't ADMIT it.
http://www.rationalrevolution.net/war/american_supporters_of_the_europ
.htm


That said, SOME americans did *not* support Franco, and snuck over there to form the "Abraham Lincoln Brigade"(1) and fought for the Anarchists.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abraham_Lincoln_Brigade
(1) This demonstrates a shocking ignorance of history cause Lincoln and Franco would have got on REAL good!

Of course, Anarchists being Anarchists, and foolishly trying to wage a conventional war on up to five fronts at once without any organization, it was kind of a foregone conclusion.
IMHO - the biggest mistake they made was trying to play the game by the enemies rules, it killed them, in the end, and crippled them from the beginning.
But see, again, Orwell was *THERE*, present and in person, at pointblank range and he saw with his own eyes the "true colors" of those involved.

And thus he wrote Homage to Catalonia.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homage_to_Catalonia

It was his experiences there, I think, which solidly influenced all his future works and the basis on which they were written, essentially this being the "root" of all his other work, but that's just my opinion.

Here's some more on that for you - folks like to dispute my words in regards to how Anarchists actually fight when forced to, thinking they meekly knuckle under like everyone else - they don't.
I *seriously* encourage you to read this bit, if no other.
http://www.english.illinois.edu/maps/scw/anarchist.htm


Oh yes, and Movies - Demolition Man.
Cause I swear that damn flick looks more prescient every day.

-F



I'll have to put that book on my list Frem.

Part of me would really love to witness true Anarchy, but is it really viable?

If we were ever thrust into a world tomorrow where all tech and government were gone, and we were left to fend for ourselves, it would be up to us to form even "small governments" to group together to fend off the roving bands of pillagers and rapists.

I know that you and I have the ability to survive in that type of world today, as well as zero desire to head a movement that could become a small form of government.... but as well as we'd be able to take care of ourselves if that time came, how well could we be able to also look out for everyone we cared about, with so much unbridled evil roaming around?



The Postman.....

Great flick.



I do believe in the ideal of a Democratic Republic in the face of the evil unknown.

The problem with even the most benevolent of movements is that after they've acquired what they originally set out to achieve, the ones who hold the power hand it over to sons and nephews (and these days also to daughters and nieces) and they inflict the exact same pain on everyone else, except now it's legal to do so.....

Anarchy isn't the answer.... Government isn't the answer....

I don't know what the answer is.....

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Thursday, May 31, 2012 9:19 PM

MAGONSDAUGHTER


Quote:

Originally posted by Magonsdaughter:
Books

Catcher in the Rye JD Salinger
Nineteen Eighty Four - George Orwell
To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee
The Road - Cormac McCarthy
lord of the Rings - Tolkein
Cloudstreet - Tim Winton





I forgot to add Cold Mountain by Charles Frazier and Independence Day by Richard Ford and a short story collection by Raymond Carver. Gotta love American fiction.

of course there are the british classics, Persuasion by Jane Austin, Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte.... I could go on and on, but if I have to explain why, I just don't have the time.


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Friday, June 1, 2012 7:33 AM

KWICKO

"We'll know our disinformation program is complete when everything the American public believes is false." -- William Casey, Reagan's presidential campaign manager & CIA Director (from first staff meeting in 1981)


On the non-fiction front,

Day One: Before Hiroshima & After by Peter Wyden
The Making of the Atomic Bomb by Richard Rhodes
The Killer Angels by Michael Shaara (this is actually an historical novel, a novelized version of actual events of the battle of Gettysburg)
The Hot Zone by Richard Preston
The Coming Plague by Laurie Garrett
And the Band Played On by Randy Shilts


And of course, Carl Sagan's Cosmos and James Burke's The Day the Universe Changed.







"I supported Bush in 2000 and 2004 and intellegence [sic] had very little to do with that decision." - Hero


"I've not watched the video either, or am incapable of intellectually dealing with the substance of this thread, so I'll instead act like a juvenile and claim victory..." - Rappy

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Friday, June 1, 2012 9:34 AM

OONJERAH



I very much enjoyed The Killer Angels.

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Friday, June 1, 2012 10:21 AM

FREMDFIRMA


Quote:

I know that you and I have the ability to survive in that type of world today, as well as zero desire to head a movement that could become a small form of government.... but as well as we'd be able to take care of ourselves if that time came, how well could we be able to also look out for everyone we cared about, with so much unbridled evil roaming around?

That's the kicker, Jack - look at ANY post-catastrophe society, Rwanda, Somalia, others...
And WHO are the bringers of that unbridled evil, mano ?

The remnants and hangers-on of... *drumroll please*... GOVERNMENT.
Hell, even the Afghani Warlords, Northern Alliance, Taliban - remnants of Governments.

The essential problem isn't roving bands of reavers straight out of The Road Warrior, that's pure fiction for the most part cause such bands are completely unsustainable over time due to lack of resources and casualties incurred by resistance - not to mention ultimately self destructive, something known since the 1300's really, no farmers = no farms = no food.
The Rwandans learned that to their peril, and this is one of the REASONS I am wholly against sending food aid to those who perpetuated those massacres, said bastards being the Government, as usual.

Nope, the essential problem, as you'll quickly learn by reading about what happened in Catalonia, is that every other Government on the PLANET will attack you, because your very EXISTENCE is a threat to them, shows up the excuses they have for Government as a lie, shows there is another functional way to do it.
Just like Religions admit failure by their pressing need to not only attack, but utterly destroy any other option for fear that once that is known thier victims will flee to it in droves, so too with Government.
This is a complete admission of abject and utter failure, that they cannot compete in light of any other option - and what then does that say of folks who would doom all to a model they KNOW has failed, will destroy them, then allow the chain to slip, hmm ?

I note that a great part of my 'job' is more or less "looking out for everyone", and although I do get paid, cause this is rather necessary to keeping food on my table, I actually *LIKE* what I do.
Sure, in the grand scheme of things this podunk little place is just a speck of dirt, but it's *MY* speck of dirt, and messing with it is a seriously all-time bad idea.
Quote:

This was no ordinary army. There were no uniforms (neck scarves usually indicated what organisation a militia member belonged to) or officers who enjoyed privileges over the ordinary soldiers. This was a revolutionary army and reflected the revolutionary principles of those in its ranks. Democracy was control. The basic unit was the group, composed generally of ten, which elected a delegate. Ten groups formed a century which also elected a delegate. Any number of centuries formed a column, which had a war committee responsible for the overall activities of the column. This was elected and accountable to the workers. Columns generally had ex-officers and artillery experts to advise them - but these were not given any power.

Workers joined the columns because they wanted to. They understood the need to fight and the necessity of creating a "popular army". They accepted discipline not because they were told to but because they understood the need to act in a co-ordinated manner. Members accepted orders because they trusted those who gave them. They had been elected from their own ranks. Militias were aligned with different organisations and often had their own newspapers. These were political organisations that understood the link between revolutionary politics and the war. The militias formed in Barcelona lost no time in marching on Aragon where the capital, Saragossa, had been taken by the fascists. The Durruti Column, named after one of the leading CNT militants, led this march and gradually liberated village after village. The aim was to free Saragossa which linked Catalonia with the second industrial region - the Basque Country, which as well as being a source of raw materials had heavy industries and arms manufacturing plants.

The Durruti column showed how to fight fascism. They understood that a civil war is a political battle, not just a military conflict. As they gained victory after victory they encouraged peasants to take over the land and collectivise. The Column provided the defence that allowed this to be done. The peasants rallied to them. They fed the worker- soldiers and many of them joined. Indeed Durutti had to plead with some of them not to join so that the land would not be depopulated and the task of collectivisation could be carried through.

As the anarchist militias achieved success after success ground was being lost on other fronts. Saragossa, though, was not taken and a long front developed. The militia system was blamed for this. The Stalinists said the workers were undisciplined and would not obey orders. They accused the anarchists of being unwilling to work with others to defeat the fascists.

Of course this was nonsense. The anarchists continually called for a united war effort and even for a single command. What they did demand, though, was that control of the army stayed with the working class. They did not believe that establishing a united command necessitated re-establishing the old militarist regime the officer caste.

The major problem facing the militias was a lack of arms. The munitions industry been cut off and the workers in Barcelona went to great lengths to improvise. Arms were made and transported to the front but there were still not enough of them. George Orwell (who fought in one of the POUM militias) described the arms situation on the Aragon front. The infantry "were far worse armed than an English public school Officers Training Corps, with worn out Mauser rifles which usually jammed after five shots; approximately one machine gun to fifty men (sic) and one pistol or revolver to about thirty men (sic). These weapons, so necessary in trench warfare, were not issued by the government.... A government which sends boys of fifteen to the front with rifles forty years old and keeps its biggest men and newest weapons In the rear is manifestly more afraid of the revolution the fascists".

And how right he was. An arms embargo was imposed by Britain preventing the sale of arms to either side, but not until mid-August. The government which had 600,000,000 dollars in gold, could have brought arms. Eventually this gold was sent to Moscow in exchange for arms but when they arrived there was a systematic refusal to supply the anarchist-controlled Aragon front. The arms that did arrive were sent only to Stalinist-controlled centres. A member of the war ministry referring to the arms which arrived in September commented "I noticed that these were not being given out in equal quantities, but there was a marked preference for the units which made up the Fifth Regiment". This was controlled by the Stalinists. The Catalan munitions plants, which depended on the central government for finance were compelled to surrender their product to such destinations as the government chose. This withholding of arms was fundamental to the strategy of the Stalinists and their allies in government for breaking down the power and prestige of the CNT. The communists wanted to undermine the militias in their efforts to have the regular army restarted. But more of this later.

This lack of arms did not only affect the Aragon front. Irun fell because of the shortage of weapons. One reporter described it. "They fought to the last cartridge (the workers of Irun. When they had no more ammunition they hurled packs of dynamite. When the dynamite was gone they rushed forward barehanded while the sixty times stronger enemy butchered them with their bayonets'. In Asturia the workers were bogged down trying to take Oviedo armed with little more than rifles and crude dynamite bombs. Although a few planes and artillery pieces were begged for, the workers were turned down. Again the government's fear of revolutionary workers took precedence over defeating the fascists.

It is a common lie that the militias, supposedly undisciplined and uncontrollable, were responsible for Franco's advance. All who saw the militias in action had nothing but praise for the heroism they witnessed. The government made a deliberate choice. It chose to starve the revolutionary workers of arms, it decided that defeating the revolution was more important than defeating fascism.




WHEN Anarchists fight, when they must, that's generally how it goes.
Again, problem is, you'll run out of Anarchists long before a Government runs out of conscripted cannon fodder - the American Civil War kinda proved this out as well, being that the Unions favorite tactic was more or less bury the Confederates in bodies and who cares which, cause they'll just get some more, not like anyone IMPORTANT was dying, right ?

Ergo, the only way you'd ever build a successful Anarchist colony in the modern era is to build it around a nuclear weapon, preferably several, with the range to hit the folks who'd be giving the orders to that cannon fodder - nothing less awful would serve.

-Frem

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Friday, June 1, 2012 10:22 AM

FREMDFIRMA


Quote:

Originally posted by BYTEMITE:
OBVIOUSLY. Take a pie chart of percentages of the population with some mental disorder, hang it on a wall, use it as a dart board. If you hit one, I probably have it.


I am SO stealing this - I might make it a wall poster for my office.

-F

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Friday, June 1, 2012 11:23 AM

OONJERAH



Applies to me also. I called it Mental Illness Stew ...
such an awkward phrase. A pie chart is catchier.

Diverse parentage, I guess, can teach multiple dysfunctions.

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Friday, June 1, 2012 11:27 AM

KWICKO

"We'll know our disinformation program is complete when everything the American public believes is false." -- William Casey, Reagan's presidential campaign manager & CIA Director (from first staff meeting in 1981)


Heck, just put it on a spinner and call it the Wheel of Misfortune. What's it gonna be today, wheel? Manic? Depressive? Bipolar? Shift-work Disorder?

(You think I'm kidding about that last one, but they're actually advertising a new prescription medicine for that one right now. NuVigil, I think they call it, and if you read the list of possible side effects, it is all but indistinguishable from methamphetamine!)



"I supported Bush in 2000 and 2004 and intellegence [sic] had very little to do with that decision." - Hero


"I've not watched the video either, or am incapable of intellectually dealing with the substance of this thread, so I'll instead act like a juvenile and claim victory..." - Rappy

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Friday, June 1, 2012 10:09 PM

MAGONSDAUGHTER


'Guns, Germs and Steel; by Jared Diamond, because it was a unique way of looking at civilisation that really, maybe for the first time busted out of that 'aren't we in the west so superior' way of thinking. His Collapse was excellent as well.

Downfall, the book by Hitler's secretary Traudl Jung and the film based upon it. Both cut through the Hitler myth to the man, compelling and tragic.

The Diary of Anne Frank, probably one of the first books I read that touched on the holocaust, and it was understated and unforgetable.


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Sunday, June 3, 2012 6:49 PM

RIONAEIRE

Beir bua agus beannacht


Hi Jack, it doesn't sound like you're enjoying that Torchlight game anymore, maybe time to give it to a friend?

I love the movie of Cold Mountain, one of my favorite sex scenes, and I'm picky about my sex scenes. I really should read the book. I didn't like Angela's Ashes, the movie. It felt like they changed directors two thirds of the way through. I found it uninteresting once he got older, I got bored. I did however like the part about when he gets drunk and comes in singing all his father's old songs, a great illustration of the cycles we repeat without meaning to in life, the generational curse if you will, though I do like songs like that, The Rising of the Moon, etc. The songs aren't the problem of course.

I assume you're my pal until you let me know otherwise.

"A completely coherant River means writers don't deliver" KatTaya.

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Tuesday, June 5, 2012 6:30 PM

6IXSTRINGJACK


Heh....

I can't blame it on Torchlight...

What I'm trying to do is completely inconsequential to the game, since I've already beaten it twice with two different characters.... The only reason a "sane" person would continue on, is to play the 3rd and final character type.

I play it because it is part of my routine at the moment, until it's not...

I wake up around 4:30 to 5:00 AM and water my lawn... get a few dungeons in and rotate the sprinkler....

Then I watch TV until I sleep until about 8AM and start rehab/lawn improvement......

Thus is my life....

To some, a sad and lonely existance, I'm sure....

But for the glory days of the past, I have nothing else to compare it to...

Quote:

Originally posted by RionaEire:
Hi Jack, it doesn't sound like you're enjoying that Torchlight game anymore, maybe time to give it to a friend?

I love the movie of Cold Mountain, one of my favorite sex scenes, and I'm picky about my sex scenes. I really should read the book. I didn't like Angela's Ashes, the movie. It felt like they changed directors two thirds of the way through. I found it uninteresting once he got older, I got bored. I did however like the part about when he gets drunk and comes in singing all his father's old songs, a great illustration of the cycles we repeat without meaning to in life, the generational curse if you will, though I do like songs like that, The Rising of the Moon, etc. The songs aren't the problem of course.

I assume you're my pal until you let me know otherwise.

"A completely coherant River means writers don't deliver" KatTaya.


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Wednesday, June 6, 2012 7:20 PM

RIONAEIRE

Beir bua agus beannacht


Well now you have that new job, so that will improve things in your routine I bet.

I assume you're my pal until you let me know otherwise.

"A completely coherant River means writers don't deliver" KatTaya.

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The Irrelevance of (our) Opinion
Wed, November 26, 2014 00:37 - 4 posts
Hands up of everyone who thinks Bill Cosby raped his way through his career??
Wed, November 26, 2014 00:28 - 65 posts
Russia Invades Ukraine
Wed, November 26, 2014 00:28 - 749 posts
Is Ferguson just another Ukraine?
Tue, November 25, 2014 23:42 - 17 posts
I don't even know what most of you are talking about anymore.....
Tue, November 25, 2014 19:49 - 104 posts
Another Unarmed Black Teen Killed
Tue, November 25, 2014 19:35 - 538 posts
TV and football.
Tue, November 25, 2014 18:55 - 11 posts
Australia: The Forgotten Coup
Tue, November 25, 2014 17:25 - 1 posts
Benghazi - The Shocking Truth!
Tue, November 25, 2014 16:24 - 25 posts
Mao's Great Famine
Tue, November 25, 2014 13:25 - 44 posts
I wanna see you be brave..
Tue, November 25, 2014 12:11 - 4 posts

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